Couch potatoes that can't detach themselves from TV may have inherited their heritage, in order to allow researchers to discover that sex in their genes could

  • Scientists were looking for a link between a person's genes and sedentary behavior
  • Found 169 pieces of genetic code related to driving, computer use and TV
  • Viewing more than 1.5 hours below is linked to 42% increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD)

Couch potatoes that can't stop watching TV now have the perfect look – it's all in their genes.

A large-scale UK study suggests that some people are just hard to sit and watch television.

Those who watch more than the average 2 hours 48 minutes a day have genetic quirks in common – and so do those who don't spend a lot of free time on their computer or who don't drive for long periods of time. .

Couch potatoes that can't stop watching TV now have the perfect look – it's all in their genes (Picture Image)

Researchers asked 422,218 people aged 40 to 69 how many hours a day they saw on TV. They found 145 genetic variants to look more like the average viewer.

The same people may also be afraid of heart problems – looking at the average every 90 minutes is linked to a 44 percent higher risk of coronary disease.

However, adults can overcome genetics and change their behavior. Study author Dr Niek Verweij of & # 39; Grinzer University in Holland and Oxford-based firm Genomics PLC said: & # 39; Sedentary behaviors, and especially television viewing, can be hereditary. However, this will only play a small part.

The average Briton watches about 2.8 hours of television per day, but this borderline oversees health even those who don't spend as much free time away from their computer as they do for long periods of time (stock)

The average Briton watches about 2.8 hours of television a day, but this borderline overshadows health Those who see more than the average 2 hours 48 minutes a day have genetic quirks in general – and they do even those who don't spend as much free time away from their computer as they do for long periods of time (stock)

Genetic analysis of over 400,00 Britons reveal 145 pieces of DNA linked to TV shows. Similar genetic connections to other sedentary behaviors - such as using a computer for several hours or long disks - were also discovered, but there was no connection between this and coronary artery disease, the study found (stock)

Genetic analysis of over 400,00 Britons reveal 145 pieces of DNA linked to TV shows. Similar genetic connections to other sedentary behaviors – such as using a computer for several hours or long disks – were also discovered, but there was no connection between this and coronary artery disease, the study found (stock)

& # 39; People will also do this more often when they grow up in a household where & # 39; TV is part of & # 39; a lifestyle. & # 39; The results also showed that gene variants thought to play a role in TV viewing are also seen among those who are less educated and those with a higher Body Mass Index.

The study, published in Nature Communications magazine, found 36 genetic variations that adults could spend more than the average one hour a day on a home computer and four that seem to result in their more time driving.

Dr Verweij added: & # 39; The message of this study is that it is not healthy to sit around all day, regardless of genetics, and it is never too late to start moving anymore. & # 39;

Coronary artery disease (CAD) clogs the blood vessels and can lead to angina, stroke and heart attacks

Coronary artery disease occurs when the main blood vessels that supply the heart with oxygen and nutrients are damaged.

CAD affects more than 1.6 million million men and one million women in the UK, and a total of 15 million adults in & # 39; e FS.

It is usually associated with plaque and inflammation.

As a plaque builds up, it narrows the arteries, reducing blood flow to the heart.

In & # 39; & # 39; e time can cause this angina, while complete blockage can result in a heart attack.

Many people initially have no symptoms, but when the plaque builds up, they can cause chest pain or shortness of breath when exercising or contracting.

Other causes of CAD include smoking, diabetes and an inactive lifestyle.

It can be prevented by quitting smoking, controlling conditions such as diabetes such as high blood pressure, staying active, eating well and managing stress.

Drugs can help lower cholesterol, while aspirin thins the blood to reduce the risk of lumps.

In severe cases, stents may be placed in the arteries to open them, while coronary bypass surgery creates a graft to prevent the blocked arteries with a vessel from another part of the body.

Source: Mayo Clinic

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