The US Army is set to & # 39; corona-kill robots & # 39; use that does not work with ultraviolet light (UV) to disinfect confined spaces.

The four-wheeled autonomous robots would eliminate the need for human workers and complete the task in a matter of hours, instead of days.

The technology is capable of emitting nearly 110 watts with the help of a vertical UV mount that's two feet away in just a minute of disinfection.

Although experts have not yet determined if UV kills the virus, the military said it & # 39; uses dual & # 39; a wattage known to kill other coronavirus variants to ensure efficacy, & # 39; reported Military.com.

Scroll down for video

The four-wheeled autonomous robots would eliminate the need for human workers and complete the task in a matter of hours, instead of days. The technology is capable of emitting nearly 110 watts with a vertical UV mount that's two feet away in just a minute of disinfection

The coronavirus is spread from person to person, so disinfectant surfaces have become a major player to keep the outbreak at bay.

At least 150 military bases in the US have been hit by the virus and more than 3,000 members of the & # 39; e army are infected.

Now, a company is transforming target-forming robots into corona-killing machines.

Ralph Petroff, President of & # 39; North America Branch of Marathon Targets, told Military.com:' If you need them for target practice, you use them for target practice; if you need them for corona killing, use them for corona kill. & # 39;

Petroff explained that the company bought UV disinfection panels earlier this month and it took only a few hours to add them to & # 39; robots, which are currently being tested on a military basis.

Afirm transforms target-moving robots (image) into corona-killing machines. It takes just over a minute for the robot to clean a surface two feet away, while it can disinfect an area of ​​feet in just six minutes and 30 seconds

Afirm transforms target-moving robots (image) into corona-killing machines. It takes just over a minute for the robot to clean a surface two feet away, while it can disinfect an area of ​​feet in just six minutes and 30 seconds

It takes just over a minute for the robot to clean a surface two feet away, while it can disinfect an area rivaling feet in just six minutes and 30 seconds.

Traditionally, military bases would employ personnel dressed in hazmat suits to get the job done, which can be a tough day.

& # 39; The UV part is the easy part, & # 39; said Petroff.

& # 39; Try to get an autonomous robot to run without & # 39; Stuffing things and knowing where it is at all times is the hard part. We managed that a long time ago. & # 39;

Although experts have not determined whether UV light kills coronavirus or not, a scientist at the University of Columbia in New York has investigated how to use it to prevent the spread of disease.

Germicidal UV light is used in hospitals and medical centers to clean rooms and equipment, but it is a health hazard to humans and can cause skin cancer and eye diseases.

At least 150 military bases in the US have been hit with the virus and more than 3,000 members of the & # 39; e army are infected

At least 150 military bases in the US have been hit with the virus and more than 3,000 members of the & # 39; e army are infected

But there is a special type of UV light called far-UVC light that kills microbes but is not dangerous.

Conventional germicidal UV light kills microbes, but also penetrates the skin, increasing the risk of various forms of skin cancer as cataracts.

A 2018 study published in Scientific Reports, Dr David Brenner, director of the & # 39; e School & # 39; s Center of Radiological Research, shows that light can kill more than 95 percent of viruses such as the coronavirus.

That's because the virus is covered with a thin membrane that is easily broken apart by UV rays.

Brenner's team has since tested light against two seasonal coronaviruses, and is now testing the penalties responsible for the pandemic, SARS-CoV-2.

& # 39; We thought we could kill 99 percent of the virus with a very low dose of far-UVC light, & # 39; he told ABC News.

& # 39; D & # 39; there is no reason to believe it will be any different than these results. & # 39;

However, there is one hiccup. Far-UVC lamps have not yet been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration.

When approved, Brenner told ABC News that they can be used in all public places, including modes of transportation such as airports and train stations, in addition to schools and hospitals.

To date, there have been more than 1,000,100 confirmed cases in the US of the coronavirus, which has been blamed for more than 56,000 deaths

To date, there have been more than 1,000,100 confirmed cases in the US of the coronavirus, which has been blamed for more than 56,000 deaths

. (tagsToTranslate) dailymail (t) sciencetech (t) coronavirus

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here