Scientists find that time passes nanoseconds faster to & # 39; the top of skyscrapers than to & # 39; e ground

  • Researchers in Japan climbed the Tokyo Skytree to measure the passage of time
  • They found that time went four nanoseconds faster to & # 39; the top of & # 39; e tower
  • The Skytree is the tallest building in the world, measuring 2,080 feet high
  • Earlier research had shown that time is running faster in & # 39; orbit & # 39; e upper atmosphere, but this project is the first to show the phenomenon in skyscrapers

A new study from & # 39; The University of Tokyo has shown that time actually runs at a different speed to & # 39; e top of skyscrapers and other tall buildings.

A team, led by professor of quantum electronics Hidetoshi Katori, climbed to the top of & # 39; e Tokyo Skytree, the tallest building of & # 39; the world at 2,080 feet, and found that time went more than four nanoseconds faster than at ground level.

Previous research has shown that time is running faster in the upper sphere, where & # 39; s GPS satellites are around & # 39; earth homes, but this marks the first time the effect has been measured in skyscrapers or other spaces that are not open to the public.

A team of researchers from & # 39; University of Tokyo found that time is running fast at & # 39; a top of skyscrapers and other tall buildings than it does at ground level, up to four nanoseconds faster

According to a report in Asahi Shimbun, the difference is explained by Einstein's theory of relativity, which found that time is related to the strength of gravity at the point where it is not measured.

This phenomenon affects the relative motion of electrons that orbit around the nucleus of an atom, which emit electromagnetic radiation as they change energy levels used by scientists to to measure the time.

These emissions vary with different gravities, and can be measured with devices called atomic grid clocks, which do not use a supercooled vacuum chamber to track electromagnetic radiation without background interference.

These devices typically fill hot labs, but Katori and his team were able to design a custom unit to fit & # 39; the size of a large refrigerator and transport it to the top of & # 39; a sky tree.

Once on & # 39; top of & # 39; On the tour, the team faced some other unexpected challenges, including vibrations from nearby train traffic that disturbed their measurements.

The team climbed to the top of & # 39; Tokyo Skytree, the tallest building of & # 39; a world at 2080 feet, where they used an atomic grid clock to measure electromagnetic radiation that is a simple tool for quantifying time

The team climbed to the top of & # 39; Tokyo Skytree, the tallest building of & # 39; a world at 2080 feet, where they used an atomic grid clock to measure electromagnetic radiation that is a simple tool for quantifying time

They also had trouble getting their clock to cool properly because of the heating system in a skyscraper.

After a few modifications, including installing a vibration damper on & # 39; clock, the team was able to start reading.

For Katori, the results are less interesting for what they tell us over time than what they can mean for predicting future natural disasters.

He believes in the future an ultrasensitive atomic grid clock could be used to detect earthquakes of volcanic activity by taking similar measurements of electromagnetic radiation.

WHAT IS EINSTEIN GENERAL THEORY OF RELATIVITY?

Albert Einstein (pictured) published his General Theory of Relativity in 1915

Albert Einstein (pictured) published his General Theory of Relativity in 1915

In 1905, Albert Einstein determined that the laws of physics were the same for all non-accelerating observers, and that the velocity of light in a vacuum was independent of & # 39; e movement of all observers – known as the theory of special relativity.

This groundbreaking work introduced a new framework for all physics, and proposed new concepts of space and time.

He then spent 10 years trying to incorporate acceleration into the theory, and eventually published his theory of general relativity in 1915.

This suggests that massive objects cause distortion in space-time, which is not felt as gravity.

At its simplest, it can be thought of as a giant rubber plate with a bowling ball in the center.

Pictured is the original historical documents related to Einstein & # 39; s prediction of the existence of gravitational waves, shown at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Pictured is the original historical documents related to Einstein & # 39; s prediction of the existence of gravitational waves, shown at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem

As the ball warms the blade, a planet bends the dust of space-time, creating the force we feel as gravity.

Any object that comes close to the body fails because of the effect.

Einstein predicted that if two massive bodies came together, it would make such a great ripple in space that it would be observable on Earth.

It was mostly demonstrated in the hit movie Interstellar.

In a segment that saw the crew looking at a planet that fell within the gravity of an enormous black hole, the event provided time to massively slow down.

Crew members on the planet were hardly old, while those on the ship were decades older on their return.

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