It may only be 18 seconds long, but the first video that was uploaded to YouTube 15 years ago paved the way for the platform's success today.

Thursday marks the anniversary of the clip titled & # 39; Me at the zoo & it was shared by the co-founder of the site on April 23, 2005.

The video shows Karim standing in front of an elephant exhibit at the San Diego Zoo that & # 39; tells the camera that the animals & # 39; have really long tree trunks. & # 39;

Though simple and short, the video has been viewed more than 90 million times since its debut 15 years ago.

It may only be 18 seconds long, but the first video that was uploaded to YouTube 15 years ago paved the way for the platform's success today. Thursday marks the anniversary of the clip titled & # 39; Me at the zoo & it was shared by co-founder of Jawed Karim site on April 23, 2005

Karim & # 39; s video was just the beginning of what YouTube is today.

Now it is a destination for artists, musicians and makers to share their work and view it by millions – maybe even billions.

The hit song & # 39; Despacito & # 39; by Luis Fonsi is the most popular video, which has been viewed more than 6.7 billion times as of April 2020.

A year after & # 39; Me at the zoo & # 39; making its debut, Karim and his fellow founders sold the platform to Google for $ 1.65 billion.

The video shows Karim standing in front of an elephant exhibit at the San Diego Zoo that & # 39; tells the camera that the animals & # 39; have really long tree trunks. & # 39; Though simple and short, the video has been viewed more than 90 million times since its debut 15 years ago

The video shows Karim standing in front of an elephant exhibit at the San Diego Zoo that & # 39; tells the camera that the animals & # 39; have really long tree trunks. & # 39; Though simple and short, the video has been viewed more than 90 million times since its debut 15 years ago

And today, YouTube has over 2 billion subscribed users each month, according to YouTube.

Although hugely popular, YouTube has come under fire amid the pandemic of coronavirus that doesn't sweep the world.

Earlier this month, it found that the platform made money by allowing ads to run on videos that promote false COVID-19 treatments.

The Video Streaming site publishes ads on videos that promote shamefulness such as herbs and smoothies for the deadly, nonprofit research initiative claimed by the Tech Transparency Project (TTP).

Providers including Donald Trump's Donald Re-election campaign, Facebook, Liberty Mutual Insurance and streaming startup Quibi all had adverts attached to such videos & # 39; one of which is titled & # 39; cure coronavirus with this home remedy & # 39; called.

The hit song & # 39; Despacito & # 39; by Luis Fonsi (pictured) is the most popular video, hit with more than 6.7 billion views since April 2020

The hit song & # 39; Despacito & # 39; by Luis Fonsi (pictured) is the most popular video, hit with more than 6.7 billion views since April 2020

The site lists & # 39; disinformation peddlers & # 39; earn money from advertising, TTP claims, despite promises to allow only reputable videos on & # 39; site.

Both YouTube and the content creators who have video content on their site can benefit from advertising.

The contagious videos included those promoting quack coronavirus treatments such as dodgy and ineffective home remedies, unsafe levels of added supplements such as vitamin C and even meditative music.

A Facebook ad reportedly appeared on a YouTube video that promised to boost viewers' immune systems and fight coronavirus with music that enhances cognitive positivity through subtle, yet powerful theta- using waves & # 39 ;.

TTP said a search for & # 39; home remedy & # 39; of coronavirus & # 39; returned a video that promised to cure the serious respiratory illness with recipes for smoothies for fruits and vegetables – that & # 39; t started with an & # 39; a Trump campaign.

Although hugely popular, YouTube has come under fire amid the pandemic of coronavirus that doesn't sweep the world. Earlier this month, the platform was found to be making money by allowing ads to run on videos that promote false COVID-19 treatments

Although hugely popular, YouTube has come under fire amid the pandemic of coronavirus that doesn't sweep the world. Earlier this month, it was found that the platform made money by running ads on videos that promote false COVID-19 treatments

The same ad was said to appear before a video discussing & # 39; 10 herbs that kill & # 39; viruses and wipe out your lungs, which did not specifically mention coronavirus, but appeared in a coronavirus -related search.

Ads for the American insurance company Liberty Mutual appeared before a video with Polish languages ‚Äč‚Äčthat advised viewers themselves not to step foot in Chinese restaurants to prevent them from getting COVID-19.

Disney-supported streaming platform Quibi ads appeared before a Bengali video claiming that drinking water can prevent coronavirus infections, while e-learning platform Masterclass was advertised alongside a Hindi video that promoted burning incense and eating gooseberry -like Amla fruit and Neem as remedies.

& # 39; The findings show that YouTube ownership of YouTube has provided economic incentives for people to create and disseminate false and misleading information about the pandemic on their platform, which has almost overcrowded reach across the globe , & # 39; said TTP in a post on.

. (tagsToTranslate) dailymail (t) sciencetech

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