Battle the birds! Study finds that the New York and Boston pigeons do not mix, so that not enough green space between cities prevents them from migrating

  • The rivalry between New York and Boston is found in the & # 39; dove of & # 39; e cities
  • Experts discovered genetic differences in & # 39; birds along the east coast
  • There is intermediate breeding of pigeons started in Virginia to the south Connecticut
  • But the birds do not migrate south due to a lack of urbanization

The rivalry between New York and Boston is primarily focused on sports, but a new study shows it has been transferred to the animal kingdom.

Investigators found burglary among pigeons who did not live in the Eastern Seaboard, while those who call New England home had their own genetic cluster.

The discovery was made after biologists sampled the blood of hundreds of birds along the east coast and found connections in Baltimore, Washington, Philadelphia and New York.

But some differences were seen in birds that didn't start in northern Connecticut and up in Boston.

The experts believe this is due to decreased urbanization that leaves rural green space in Connecticut, which keeps the pigeons from crossing over to New York City.

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Researchers found breeding pigeons that did not live on the Eastern Seaboard, while those who called New England home had their own genetic cluster. The discovery was made after biologists sampled hundreds of birds on the east coast and connections were found in Baltimore, Washington, Philadelphia and New York (pictured)

The study was conducted by Elizabeth Carlen, a biologist at Fordham University, who took a road trip from Virginia to Providence, Rhode Island, the New York Times reported.

Along this journey, they captured pigeons with a net gun and took hundreds of blood samples.

Following the analyzes, Carlen found that the birds that lived in Virginia to the southern Connecticut area showed signs of interracial.

But she and her co-author found that it changed the farther north they traveled – there was a 'distinct pigeon supercity' that started in Providence and moved to Boston.

New York and Boston are less than 200 miles apart, but this area lacks urbanization and keeps pigeons from crossing into rival cities. Artificial light at night satellite maps mark the gap between the two metropolitan regions

New York and Boston are less than 200 miles apart, but this area lacks urbanization and keeps pigeons from crossing into rival cities. Artificial light at night satellite maps mark the gap between the two metropolitan regions

& # 39; We performed ddRAD – Seqon 473 samples, retrieved 35,200 SNPs & then used multiple evolutionary clustering analyzes to investigate population structure, & # 39; wrote the team in & # 39; study published in & # 39; a Wiley Online Library.

& # 39; These analyzes revealed that pigeons formed two genetic clusters – a northern cluster with samples from Boston and Providence and a southern cluster with all other samples. & # 39;

& # 39; This underpinnings may be due to decreased urbanization across coastal Connecticut that separates Boston and Providence from New York and mid-Atlantic cities. & # 39;

Carlen told the New York Times that the findings were surprising, because they had hypothesized that each city had a separate population.

The results can come from one pigeon that & # 39; an out of town mate every generation & # 39; finds out how cities like Baltimore, Washington, Philadelphia and New York can have so many genetic similarities, she said.

But some differences were seen in birds that didn't start in northern Connecticut and up around Boston (pictured). The experts believe this is due to reduced urbanization in Connecticut that keeps the pigeons from crossing over to New York City

But some differences were seen in birds that didn't start in northern Connecticut and up around Boston (pictured). The experts believe this is due to decreased urbanization in Connecticut that keeps the pigeons from crossing to New York City

New York and Boston are less than 200 miles apart, but this area lacks urbanization and keeps pigeons from crossing into rival cities.

& # 39; We found that pairs of pigeons are highly related within 25 km and that pigeons outside 50 km are no more closely related than they would be random, the team wrote in & # 39; e study.

& # 39; Our analysis revealed higher-than-expected gene flow under an isolation by distance model within each city. & # 39;

'We conclude that the extreme urbanization characteristic of Northeast megacities is likely to facilitate wildflow grazing.

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