Nurse Vicky Burns just left the moods of all her colleagues & # 39; s, explaining, & # 39; Can we just say a big thank you? & # 39;

Within 24 hours of touching on & # 39; bottom of & # 39; e UK was a 20-tonne load of personal protection equipment on its way to the NHS front line, courtesy of Mail Force, the new charity dedicated to & # 39; fighting the virus.

And Miss Burns Hospital was the first to receive some precious cargo from 50,000 coveralls and 100,000 masks that have now been added to the NHS war chest by Mail Force and its growing army of supporters.

On a morning of several major deliveries, the fiance of Prime Minister Carrie Symonds gave birth to a son born in one hospital (in London) while our fleet of vans and trucks delivered these urgently needed PPE supplies from a Heathrow -cleaning warehouse to the main NHS distribution center in & # 39; the southern Midlands for inspection and ongoing distribution.

Pictured: Vicky Burns, 31, tries a costume in & # 39; overall at Milton Keynes Hospital after & # 39; the first PPE dispatch arrived from China

The £ 1 million PPE charge had filled all available space in the & # 39; handle and box of & # 39; a chartered long-haul airline who flew into Shanghai on Tuesday.

By yesterday afternoon, the first shipments were on their way to the field – to a hospital and an ambulance trust – while plans were being drawn up for even more Mail Force lifts in the days and weeks ahead.

HERE ARE DONATES

Mail Force Charity has been launched with the sole purpose of supporting NHS staff, volunteers and health care workers to fight back against Covid-1 in the United Kingdom.

Mail Force is a separate charity set up and supported by the Daily Mail and General Trust.

The money raised will fund essential equipment that is not needed by the NHS and healthcare workers.

This equipment is essential to protecting the heroic staff while they do their fantastic job of helping the UK overcome this pandemic.

If we raise more money than is needed for vital Covid-1 equipment, we will use all funds to support the work of the & # 39; NHS in other ways.

Click the button below to make a donation:

If the button is not visible, click here

At the same time, support for the Mail Force campaign gained spectacular momentum. Created by the Daily Mail and its partners, Salesforce and Marshall Wace, the charity is specifically set to address the shortage of PPE equipment in this Covid-19 emergency.

The famed space-savvy readers of & # 39; Mail just posted their support yesterday, contributing more than £ 150,000 in the afternoon, after which & # 39; two of them & # 39; Britain's leading philanthropists in style came on board.

Tetra Pak heir Hans Rausing and his wife, art expert Julia Rausing, donated £ 1 million as a final installment of a £ 16.5 million package of emergency contributions to combat the coronavirus.

& # 39; This past month, doctors and nurses have placed themselves at risk of fighting the coronavirus for the nation, & # 39; said Mr. and Mrs. Rausing.

& # 39; We hope this new initiative is another way to show NHS staff our appreciation for them and the tedious work they do every day. & # 39;

Contributions from private tutors and our £ 2.79million partners, in addition to donations from our readers of £ 160,000, have now raised £ 2.95million for the campaign.

The sentiment was echoed across Westminster yesterday when the senior government minister, including the new father in No10, expressed support for Mail Force.

At the Downing Street press release yesterday, Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab praised a & # 39; fantastic & # 39; & # 39; charity initiative.

He said, & # 39; 100,000 masks, 50,000 coveralls all to frontline workers in & # 39; e NHS and nursing homes. You have to pay homage. The Daily Mail has contributed to that national effort and it all counts. So a big thank you from & # 39; side of & # 39; a government. & # 39;

Delivered: Nurses Vicky Burns (left) and Katherine Palmacci wheel in & # 39; newly delivered PPE kit at Milton Keynes Hospital

Delivered: Nurses Vicky Burns (left) and Katherine Palmacci wheel in & # 39; newly delivered PPE kit at Milton Keynes Hospital

The full kit: Nurse Miss Burns clapped head to foot in & # 39; the new PPE after it & # 39; s arrived at Milton Keynes University Hospital

The full kit: Nurse Miss Burns clapped head to foot in & # 39; the new PPE after it & # 39; s arrived at Milton Keynes University Hospital

The very purpose of this rapid and fierce demand for essential supplies is, of course, to make life safer for those who do not put their lives on the line for the rest of us. As many were fond of pointing out, it also reduces the overall level of anxiety.

Among the first in line for a consignment was Milton Keynes University Hospital. & # 39; I read about this plane that came full PPE – and here it is, & # 39; said protective specialty nurse, Katherine Palmacci. & # 39; We are truly grateful to everyone for their boldness and let me assure you that it is well used. & # 39;

The hospital's chief director, Professor Joe Harrison, said: & # 39; We want to thank the Daily Mail and its Mail Force campaign for joining all those who have donated PPE to NHS organizations across the country and del.

Donations like these, funded by members of the public, help us to continue the challenge of Covid-19. I know that NHS staff will be eternally grateful for the contributions that the public has made. & # 39;

The importance of & # 39; s Mail Force operation was underscored yesterday when & # 39; t a survey by the Royal College of Surgeons revealed that a third of its members in & # 39; the last two weeks had been shortages of jackets or masks.

Right on time: Mail Force van arrives at Milton Keynes University Hospital today with its vital load of PPE deliveries

Right on time: Mail Force van arrives at Milton Keynes University Hospital today with its vital load of PPE deliveries

Suitable for purpose: Nurses Miss Palmacci and Miss Burns visit a coverall suit at Milton Keynes University Hospital

Suitable for purpose: Nurses Miss Palmacci and Miss Burns visit a coverall suit at Milton Keynes University Hospital

The survey of 1,263 surgeons showed that 33 percent did not believe there was enough PPE in their hospital, with 34 per cent reporting inadequate supplies of jackets and 31 percent warning of low supply of masks.

The government's purchasing teams are continuing to do what they can in a fearless global race for the best equipment.

Hard questions will continue to be asked by the press and the public. But as is becoming increasingly clear from & # 39; s remarkable response to this campaign – and others, too, of course – the British people have decided that it is not enough just to & # 39; to sit judgment.

They are determined to do what they can to help.

Paramedics & # 39; enjoy & # 39; comfort & # 39; of Face Force face masks

By Sam Greenhill, Chief Reporter for the Daily Mail

For paramedics, the cruel gamble of catching coronaviruses attracts every time they are called out.

And yesterday evening, these lifesavers were one of the first to receive a consignment protection device directly from Mail Force.

When the masks and coveralls were unloaded at a station of the South Central Ambulance Service, paramedic team leader Lisa Pringle simply said: & # 39; Thank you. & # 39;

Just the job: Paramedic leader Lisa Pringle of the South Central Ambulance Service tries a new mask

Just the job: Paramedic leader Lisa Pringle of the South Central Ambulance Service tries a new mask

This life-saving mission

How big is the challenge?

Frontline health workers are desperately short of life-saving personal protective equipment and the Mail and our partners aim to help them.

Led by the Daily Mail, a consortium including Salesforce, the US business software giant and British asset management company, Marshall Wace, helped create Mail Force.

So what does Mail Force do?

Sourcing from all over the world the most urgently needed PPE, namely insulating jackets, overalls, and surgical masks. The charity checks in with the & # 39; purchasing department of & # 39; e health to make sure it gets the right equipment and that it does not overlap with their efforts.

How it happened

On behalf of Mail Force, we investigated PPE sources around the world, especially in China. With the help of Salesforce, reputable suppliers were found and Mail Force commissioned a jet to bring home as much as possible – £ 1 million worth of supplies that weighs over 20 tons. This is expected to be the first of many shipping of life-saving equipment.

So why choose China?

Many British companies, including Barbour and Burberry, have produced PPE for the NHS. But companies in the UK cannot supply all the country needs quickly enough. It's a shortage of liquid-resistant material for making jackets and overalls – and most of its production is in China.

Were the NHS consulted?

From the beginning, we have tried the work of & # 39; the department of & # 39; e to support health by collecting a huge amount of equipment from a single global supply in a very short time. To that end, Mail Force has consulted the NHS and the Department of Health at all stages.

While the Mail will never return from critical analysis and ask the important questions – perhaps following the government's intense discomfort – we also recognize that we all have a part to play in fighting this virus.

However, first to receive the new kit were staff at Milton Keynes University Hospital.

Among those who did not start monitoring were 31-year-old lead nurse Vicky Burns, child protection nurse Katherine Palmarcci, and sister Agnes Whiting for infection prevention.

Back at the ambulance station, Miss Pringle tried to lift one of the medical masks with air. She said, & # 39; These will be very useful and also a great comfort. As professionals, we attend every patient, but you never know who Covid-19 can have.

& # 39; We have received a great deal of PPE. We go out about 120 times a day and we have to wear PPE every time.

We also have paramedics coming out of retirement to help with this crisis, and they obviously need protection too, so we need more PPE than ever.

& # 39; Just to know that it is there for us, it really takes away the worry from the staff. It helps us as much as we see large numbers of people like these coming. & # 39;

Paramedics have no choice but to work closely with patients who may have the virus. If a patient has difficulty breathing, such as a heartbeat, crews must work close to their mouths, where potentially millions of invisible droplets of the virus can spread over them. In such cases, the head-to-toe coveralls that were just delivered were quite literally a lifesaver.

Paramedics wear them in combination with full face face masks with their own air supply.

Mark Begley, head of operations at the station, in Milton Keynes, said, & # 39; We use a lot of PPE. The amount we get is phenomenal.

& # 39; We treat every patient as potentially with Covid – we should. Receiving this mail is extremely welcome and we are very grateful for that. & # 39;

Mr Begley said his ambulance staff was determined to get through the crisis. & # 39; You can't help but be proud of them, & # 39; he said.

& # 39; Everyone has worked tirelessly to achieve this, for the patients, for everyone. It's fantastic to see. & # 39;

The Incredible Journey: In an extraordinary series of photos, how vital PPE was from China to our front … in just 24 hours

By Sam Greenhill, Chief Reporter for the Daily Mail

These were the wonderful scenes yesterday when the life-saving Mail Force kit completed its journey in the hands of doctors and nurses.

An incredible 24 hours was secured with the protective gear that does not reach the medicines that are desperately needed.

From the moment the Mail Force One jet touched down at Heathrow Tuesday, no time was wasted trying to get the 20-ton precious cargo to the right place.

From & # 39; airport to the hospitals and everywhere in between, more than a hundred people were involved in creating & # 39; e complex logistics operation a success.

1. Freight arrives in Heathrow: Chartered Mail Force jet arrives in UK with its life-saving cargo protection kit

1. Freight arrives in Heathrow: Chartered Mail Force jet arrives in UK with its life-saving cargo protection kit

First, the PPE was taken to a depot for clarification at the airport, where the mountain of boxes of masks and overalls was a breathtaking sight. The team worked through the night, and by morning, the boxes were all on board our fleet of cars ready for the next stage.

All PPE for the NHS should be taken to a dedicated hub in the Midlands, where it is logged, monitored and allocated to hospital trusts and nursing homes.

The fleet was on its way yesterday at 8am, and streaked the M1 to the NHS warehouse, which is the size of three and a half football fields. There, several dozen employees converted into & # 39; vans of & # 39; e Mail Force and – maintained social distance – unload the boxes in less than 20 minutes.

Another group immediately started logging in to the warehouse computer. Some of the boxes were ripped open to remove samples. The first glance at Mail Force's costly charge – a separate charity set up by the Mail and its partners – public package after package of white coveralls with a thin blue stripe – unflattering, but each one's life may recommend treatment of a Covid-19 patient from a physician or nurse.

2. Take It Away, Caps: The PPE is pulled from the aircraft, ready to be taken to a nearby depot

2. Take It Away, Caps: The PPE is pulled from the aircraft, ready to be taken to a nearby depot

3. Mountain of boxes at depot: PPE medical equipment from China, purchased for the NHS by The Daily Mail charity Mail Force, at a warehouse in Feltham

3. Mountain of boxes at depot: PPE medical equipment from China, purchased for the NHS by The Daily Mail charity Mail Force, at a warehouse in Feltham

Dozens of other boxes with medical masks were also loaded on wooden pallets. The crucial equipment that comes into this incredible hub is made in factories around the world, sometimes in boxes with nothing but Chinese written on labels. It should all be checked to make sure it meets British standards.

Terry Murphy, who's helping run the mega warehouse, said: "A lot of stuff comes covered in Chinese, with not much English as one. We need to make sure we know exactly what we have and that it is good enough. Then we label it again in English. & # 39;

Operations Director Martin O & # 39; Grady added: & # 39; You might think that PPE is pretty standard, but it turns out that there are actually 130 different types of dress that are used in & # 39; an NHS. We need to learn fast. & # 39;

Touring storage units have more than ten miles of shelves. A computer knows where each item can be found. Each day there is a conference chat with the NHS and Public Health England to decide where the items are most needed.

A little over a month ago, this facility did not exist. The warehouse kept shopkeepers and staff were more used to street fashion than life-saving equipment.

4. Ready for inspection: Arthur Martin of The Daily Mail with packages of white coveralls inside the warehouse

4. Ready for inspection: Arthur Martin of The Daily Mail with packages of white coveralls inside the warehouse

5. Then it goes into vans: Boxes were loaded yesterday in one of three Mail Force vans when PPE left the warehouse

5. Then it goes into vans: Boxes were loaded yesterday in one of three Mail Force vans when PPE left the warehouse

6. ... And off we go to the NHS Center: They head off to an NHS mega warehouse in the Midlands

6. … And off we go to the NHS Center: They head off to an NHS mega warehouse in the Midlands

& # 39; We got the call on a Sunday night that & # 39; t said & # 39; well, we're going to set this NHS thing up & # 39 ;, and by Thursday we were on & # 39; e battle, & # 39; said Mr. O & # 39; Grady.

& # 39; In & # 39; the first week we turned the game over as quickly as possible, and handed it out to the hospitals. By week two we were catching up and we were able to build up a bit of supplies so that deliveries could focus on what they needed most. & # 39;

Warehouse worker Marlena Dyminska, 35, from Poland, said: & # 39; We are proud to do this – it is so important to get these things to the NHS. These are difficult times for all of us, but I feel that we stick together and we will survive. & # 39;

Chelsie Faulds, 29, said: "It has been fantastic with everything that becomes part of it – and knows that we support so many people. It is an honor to do this work. & # 39; Mr. O & # 39; Grady added: & # 39; Everyone takes off their socks. The wonderful thing is how we all bonded. We all get that it's a & # 39; no-fail & # 39; scenario is. The promise is extraordinary, for a man and a woman.

7. Checked and sorted: Warehouse worker Chelsie Faulds is happy to do her bit

7. Checked and sorted: Warehouse worker Chelsie Faulds is happy to do her bit

8. ... While Social Distance: Staff unloading boxes of PPE at the mega hub 6ft apart

8. … While Social Distance: Staff unloading boxes of PPE at the mega hub 6ft apart

& # 39; It's seven days in & # 39; week, long days, and & # 39; just continue & # 39; is the mantra. Many of those employees who have been in fashion work have had a chance to help the NHS in a moment of national crisis, and probably more than half of the team would rather stick to this project than to go back go to something else. It has become a mission.

& # 39; I live in Chester and am friends with a neurosurgeon there, a midwife and two GPs. We all know people who are not on the NHS frontline who want and need this equipment. That's what keeps us working so hard. It is personal, but we also do something for our country.

& # 39; We know we are under massive pressure, literally to deliver. I ask my friends every day, & # 39; Do you get the game? & # 39; They say the situation is improving. We feel that we are in service with the NHS. Our message to our teams every day is that we are just in service to the real frontline. & # 39;

Halfway through yesterday, the first crucial deliveries arrived, with our vans full of PPE on & # 39; a road to Milton Keynes in Buckinghamshire.

Mail Force fund reaches up to £ 3 million! Beautiful £ 1 million gift from Tetra Pak philanthropists

By Vanessa Allen for the Daily Mail

Billionaire philanthropists Hans and Julia Rausing donated just £ 1 million to the new charity Mail Force.

The couple said they want to show their support for the NHS by joining the Daily Mail in support of & # 39; Mail Force's drive to add more personal protective equipment to & # 39; to provide a front line.

Their generous gift came as part of a £ 16.5 million donation they made to more than 50 causes linked to the fight against coronavirus. Mr. Rausing, 56, whose Swedish grandfather Ruben founded the food packaging company Tetra Pak, and his wife Julia, an art expert, said they want to help protect doctors and nurses from the & # 39; NHS.

Generous: Hans and Julia Rausing support many health organizations

Generous: Hans and Julia Rausing support many health organizations

Mr. And Ms. Rausing said: & # 39; We are pleased to put our support behind this excellent public / private sector initiative, and ensure that the brave men and women on & # 39; e front have the essential equipment they don't need to save lives.

& # 39; This past month, doctors and nurses have put themselves at risk to fight the coronavirus for the nation. We hope this new initiative is another way to show NHS staff our appreciation for them and the tedious work they do every day. & # 39; The Rausing family is thought to have spent at least £ 1 billion of the family fortune through decades of philanthropic donations.

When Rausing's father, also named Hans, died last summer 93 years, his fortune was estimated at £ 9.6 billion.

The Julia and Hans Rausing Trust have provided 220 grants totaling more than £ 200 million to organizations in three sectors – health and wellbeing, welfare and education, and arts and culture.

Last month, they pledged £ 16.5 million to causes related to & # 39; fight against coronavirus in & # 39; t UK, including local charities at their Gloucestershire home. The largest single gift was £ 5 million for the Covid-19 Appeal to be run by NHS Charities Together, the national charity health charity membership organization.

That was to advocate for wellness packages such as food supplies, energy snacks, soft drinks, laundry and overnight packages for frontline health workers.

It will also cover the cost of travel, parking and accommodation, along with other expenses that are available through medicine. The Rausings also identified organizations that support NHS workers, including the National Emergency Trust and the Charity Workers & # 39; Charity.

Mr. And Ms. Rausing, who lives in London and Gloucestershire, have been long-term supporters of the NHS. Before the outbreak, they donated £ 4 million to a new intensive care unit at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital. It opens this month and is already treating patients with coronavirus.

As part of their £ 16.5 million donation, Mr and Mrs Rausing donated £ 500,000 to volunteer help organization Helpforce, which helps people volunteer in hospitals and health care services.

A further £ 725,000 was given to charity food distributor FareShare, which aims to deliver an additional eight million food to vulnerable people next year. It already provides more than a million meals in a week.

The multi-million pound donation of the couple has also gone to supporting elderly and vulnerable, including gifts to Hospice UK, the Samaritans and Age UK. Another £ 500,000 was given to Refuge, to help victims of domestic abuse, following a significant increase in calls for domestic violence helplines during the lockdown.

… with £ 160k from our wonderful readers

By Arthur Martin for the Daily Mail

Generous Daily Mail readers donated more than £ 160,000 in just 24 hours to help the NHS deliver life-saving gear.

Almost 4,000 of you have pledged money to a separate charity called Mail Force, which is leading a campaign – supported by the Daily Mail – to provide frontline staff with essential security equipment.

After launching Mail Force in yesterday's paper and on MailOnline, the charity's online fundraising page was flooded with donations.

The astonishing reaction came hours after the first shipment of charity personal protective equipment, which weighed 20 tons and over £ 1 million, arrived at Heathrow Airport on Tuesday.

Image: The shipment of PPE's Daily Mail medical device shipment is filmed in Shanghai as it is loaded aboard a Mail chartered aircraft

Image: The shipment of PPE's Daily Mail medical device shipment is filmed in Shanghai as it is loaded aboard a Mail chartered aircraft

Contributions from private tutors and our £ 2.79million partners, in addition to donations from our readers of £ 160,000, have now raised £ 2.95million for the campaign. This will pay for hundreds of thousands more pieces of PPE that should be shipped to the UK.

Readers who left messages on & # 39; fundraising website described the campaign as a & # 39; fantastic initiative & hope that fresh supplies of equipment will save lives. Summarizing the feelings of many, Bob Miller wrote: & # 39; Well done for organizing such necessary help for our heroes in the NHS. & # 39;

The Daily Mail, whose owner is Viscount Rothermere, has donated £ 1 million to the campaign. The Rothermere Foundation has given a further £ 150,000, while the Rothermere / Harmsworth family has donated an additional £ 100,000. And UK asset management company Marshall Wace has pledged another £ 1 million to the cause.

But due to the unusual scale of the & # 39; crisis, more donations are desperately needed to protect frontline staff who & # 39; t & # 39; fighting a pandemic.

Any donation to Mail Force, however small, will be spent on masks, jackets and coveralls that the NHS and healthcare workers so urgently need. If there's some money left over, the charity will use it to support the NHS and health care workers in the best ways it can.

To date, more than 100 NHS workers and carers have died of the virus. They include consultants, nurses, cleaners, porters and care assistants. Dozens of carriers, including bus drivers, have also died.

Boris is praising PPE delivery

By John Stevens, Larisa Brown and Jason Groves for the Daily Mail

Praise for Mail Force was just universal among senior ministers yesterday. The greetings were led by Prime Minister Boris Johnson, and 150,000 masks and coveralls began to reach frontline workers.

He & # 39; thank you & # 39; for the delivery that he said & # 39; would help our national effort to tackle coronavirus & # 39 ;.

Cabinet ministers also speak to the Daily Mail, which has provided £ 1 million to the Mail Force Charity, in order to lose the vital equipment for those who work in hospitals across the board land.

At & # 39; daily press conference of & # 39; e Downing Street government applauded First Secretary Dominic Raab's & # 39; fantastic Mail Force Campaign & # 39 ;.

He said, & # 39; 100,000 masks, 50,000 coveralls all to frontline workers in & # 39; e NHS and nursing homes. You have to pay homage. The Daily Mail has contributed to that national effort and it all counts. So a big thank you from & # 39; side of & # 39; a government. & # 39;

Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden said, & # 39; A free and lively press is a cherished part of our democracy, but this great initiative is an example of a newspaper that is so much more.

& # 39; The Daily Mail shows what a positive role the media can have. I want to thank the newspaper and its readers for what they do to support NHS workers and the country as a whole in our fight against coronavirus. & # 39;

Commons leader Jacob Rees-Mogg said: & # 39; From veterans' medals to plastic pollution, from free trade preservation to storing post offices, the Daily Mail has a long history of campaigning on issues that matter to them. readers really mean it. During this global crisis, we all have a role to play in defeating the coronavirus – and the Daily Mail is doing its bit in the & # 39; hottest traditions of Fleet Street. & # 39;

Education Secretary Gavin Williamson said: & # 39; This is a fantastic initiative. Huge thanks to the Daily Mail and all the readers who donated their generous support and support to the & # 39; NHS. & # 39;

Cabinet Minister Michael Gove in the Commons yesterday praised the Daily Mail and its partners for establishing the Mail Force Charity. Supporters of charity emails include asset management company Marshall Wace. The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster said: & # 39; The attempt of & # 39; the Daily Mail is very welcome and I applaud it. Se hawwe it dien yn kombinaasje mei bedriuwslju ynklusyf Ian Wace en Sir Paul Marshall. & # 39;

Tory-MP Paul Bristow, dy't yn 'e kommisje foar sûnens sit, seit:' De pogingen fan Mail Force om yn fitale leveringen te fleanen binne superb en in echte ympuls foar de foarkant.

& # 39; In & # 39; e midden fan dizze lanlike need is it Mail Force-inisjatyf in geweldich foarbyld fan inisjatyf nimme. & # 39;

Sels kritici fan Daily Mail diene mei oan 'e lof foar de kampanje. Arbeidsschaduwminister Lloyd Russell-Moyle sei nettsjinsteande dat hy gjin lêzer fan 'e Mail wie, fertsjinne de krante kredyt foar' dwaan wat tige posityf '.

Jo help bewiist dat wy kinne wurde beskerme – en no is d'r in maitiid yn ús stap, skriuwt konsultant onkolooch MEENAL VIZ

As dokter dy't wurket by in sikehûs yn Londen, wêr't it gebrek oan persoanlike beskermjende apparatuer in soarch west hat foar my en myn kollega's yn it heule lân, wie de oankomst út Sina fan in loftlift fan libbensbesparjende beskermingsapparatuer wurdich £ 1 miljoen, organisearre troch de Mail Force woldiedigens, koe net mear wolkom wêze.

No sille tûzenen mear NHS-meiwurkers oan 'e Covid-19 frontline mear fertrouwen fiele yn har fermogen om pasjinten te fersoargjen, wylst se har, foar safier mooglik beskermje fan eksposysje foar it firus. Ik kin net yn wurden útdrukke hoe tankber se sille wêze foar dit inisjatyf.

Wiken lang hawwe dokters, ferpleechkundigen en oar klinysk personiel lanlik – ynklusyf dyjingen dy't wurkje yn fersoargingshuzen of dy't de kwetsbere yn har eigen huzen besykje – smeekjen foar adekwate beskerming tsjin dizze meast ynfekteare en deadlike fan firussen.

Mar oant no ta fielt it, nettsjinsteande faak beloften fan ministers dy't oanjouwe dat se alles dien hawwe wat it kostet, ús pleinen op dôve earen fallen.

As dokter dy't wurket by in sikehûs yn Londen, wêr't it gebrek oan persoanlike beskermjende apparatuer in soarch west hat foar my en myn kollega's yn it heule lân, wie de oankomst út Sina fan in loftlift fan libbensbesparjende beskermingsapparatuer wurdich £ 1 miljoen, organisearre troch de Mail Force woldiedigens, koe net mear wolkom wêze, sei Meenal Viz (stockôfbylding)

As dokter dy't wurket by in sikehûs yn Londen, wêr't it gebrek oan persoanlike beskermjende apparatuer in soarch west hat foar my en myn kollega's yn it heule lân, wie de oankomst út Sina fan in loftlift fan libbensbesparjende beskermingsapparatuer wurdich £ 1 miljoen, organisearre troch de Mail Force charity, couldn't be more welcome, said Meenal Viz (stock image)

PPE availability remains patchy and delivery irregular. There are reports of staff reusing 'single use' kit or making their own versions – anything to protect themselves.

For a charity to step in, secure significant supplies and get the job done in matter of days is truly astounding.

After seeing a copy of the Mail's dramatic front page yesterday, I doubt there was a single member of frontline staff who didn't have a spring in their step.

And yet we must not forget the frankly disgraceful circumstances that led to the NHS – one of the world's biggest employers – having to be helped out in this way.

Yes, this action reflects the Blitz Spirit of which Britain is so justly proud. But it also reflects how NHS procurement is paralysed by layers of bureaucracy.

Just this week British manufacturers accused the Government of ignoring repeated offers of critical equipment which contradicts the Department of Health's claim that the shortage of PPE is chiefly due to supply problems abroad.

And despite the Government's insistence that PPE procurement is trickier than rocket science, the arrival of Mail Force One at Heathrow this week proved it is possible to get doctors and nurses the safety equipment that they need.

Now the Government has to follow suit and bolster its supplies. For without PPE, staff on the frontline are defenceless. With this deadly virus already claiming the lives of more than 100 NHS staff, we are all fully aware that our lives are on the line.

My family and I carry an extra burden of fear because I am six-and-a-half months pregnant with my first child. Without adequate protection, how can I be certain that he or she won't be harmed?

But we are not just worried for our own safety. We are also deeply concerned that if we become infected, we may be helping the virus to continue to spread exponentially inside our hospitals where it will invariably harm our most vulnerable patients and remove us from where we are needed most.

That is why, with great reluctance, my husband Dr Nishant Joshi and I last week launched a legal challenge to the lawfulness of the Government's PPE guidance, which we maintain is misguidedly based on the notion that at-risk staff only work in Intensive Care Units.

What about our colleagues in maternity units, in A&E or any other department who have become unwell with coronavirus?

We felt abandoned by both the Government and international health bodies and so this legal action was our last resort. After all, if we're not protected, we can't protect the public. We had no choice but to protest – just as the Mail Force charity felt it had no choice but to organise this vital, life-saving airlift. It was our duty. Though it shouldn't have fallen to us to carry out.

Dr Meenal Viz is a junior clinical fellow specialising in oncology at a London hospital.

Fury as coroners told not to factor in PPE failures

By Amelia Clarke for the Daily Mail

Inquests into the deaths of NHS staff from coronavirus should not examine systemic failures to provide personal protective equipment, the chief coroner has said.

Coroners have been told an inquest is not a 'satisfactory means of deciding whether general policies and arrangements were in place' for PPE provision.

The guidance from the chief coroner for England and Wales, Mark Lucraft QC, said an inquest 'is not the right forum for addressing concerns about high-level government or public policy', the Guardian reported.

But he added a coroner may need to consider 'failures of precautions in a particular workplace' and whether this caused the deceased to contract coronavirus. Labour says the advice could limit investigations into the impact of PPE shortages on frontline staff deaths.

Lord Falconer, the shadow justice secretary, said: 'I am very worried that an impression is being given that coroners will never investigate whether a failure to provide PPE led to the death of a key worker. This guidance may have an unduly restricting effect on the width of inquests arising out of Covid-19-related deaths.'

Three weeks before his death, Peter Tun, a doctor from Reading, urged Royal Berkshire hospital to provide protective kit before it was 'too late'.

It remains unclear if an inquest into his death will take place but his family have been contacted by a coroner.

Rinesh Parmar, of the Doctors Association UK, said: 'The provision of PPE is so vital to the safety of health workers that to suggest coroners do not consider its supply in detail misses a big part of the picture. Only comprehensive inquests into the deaths of every NHS and care worker will give the bereaved the ability to ask questions and have the circumstances of their loved ones' deaths fully explained.'

Mr Lucraft cited a court ruling that said inquests should consider whether a soldier had died because a flak jacket had been pierced by a bullet. But it should not look into whether more protective flak jackets could or should have been provided by the Ministry of Defence.

It comes as hospices have warned they could run out of PPE 'within days' because those providing end-of-life care are being denied access to government supplies. ITV News reported hospices were struggling to afford protective kit because deliveries had all but stopped.

Hospices are being quoted up to 26 times higher prices for surgical masks than NHS suppliers, forcing them to go without. Their PPE crisis coincides with a trebling of the number of hospice patients in April because of the pandemic – up to 24,000 people a day.

Tracey Bleakley, chief executive of Hospice UK, said: 'Hospices will run out of this within days. They're already having to ration supplies, which means we're putting our staff at risk, and it also means we're putting people in the community at risk.'

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