Fear of contracting coronavirus has called for poison control centers in US by one-fifth, a new report finds.

In the last three months, calls have increased 16 percent from this time in 2018 and 20 percent from this time last year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed on Monday.

The authors say that centers have received several reports of adults going overboard on cleansing products, just as one woman was looking for her products in pale.

In another instance, a child of a toddler drank accidentally with a hand need.

& # 39; Although a causal association cannot be detected, the timing of these reported exposures coincided with increased media coverage of & # 39; a COVID-19 pandemic, consumer discount reports on cleaning and disinfection products, and the beginning of some local and state-of-the-art home orders, & # 39; the CDC wrote.

A CDC report found that 45,550 calls were made to US Center for Poison Control for Cleaners and Disinfectants from January 2020 to March 2020. Figure: Poison center call & # 39; related to cleaners from January to March in 2018, 2019 and 2020

This is an increase of 16.4% from January to March in 2018 and an increase of 20.4% from the same three months in 2019. Figure: Poison center call related to disinfectants from January to March in 2018, 2019 and 2020

This is an increase of 16.4% from January to March in 2018 and an increase of 20.4% from the same three months in 2019. Figure: Poison center call related to disinfectants from January to March in 2018, 2019 and 2020

The increases were due to increasing use of bleach, alcohol-free disinfectants, and hand sanitizers. Image: A worker with CleanHarbors spray disinfectant in a Marin County Fire Department ambulance in Greenbrae, California, April 14

The increases were due to increasing use of bleach, alcohol-free disinfectants, and hand sanitizers. Image: A worker with CleanHarbors spray disinfectant in a Marin County Fire Department ambulance in Greenbrae, California, April 14

For the report, the authors looked at data from the National Poison Data System from January to March and over the same months in 2019 and 2018.

Results showed that 45,550 calls were made to US centers for poison control related to cleaners and disinfectants from January 2020 to March 2020.

This is a 20.4 percent increase from the same three months last year and a 16.4 percent increase from January to March in 2018.

In particular, the number of daily calls to poison centers & # 39; sharp & # 39; increased in early March 2020 in connection with both cleaners and disinfectants (Figure).

The authors say that correlation does not necessarily cause equal, but & # 39; d & # 39; r seems to be a & # 39; & # 39; clearly wrote a temporary association with increased use of these products.

In the & # 39; cleaning category, the largest percentage of & # 39; e increase to 62.1 percent.

Among disinfectants, alcohol-free disinfectants and hand sanitizers, the largest percentages of & # 39; e increase were 36.7 percent each.

Increases were seen in all age groups, but it was highest among children five years old or younger, the CDC said.

In the # 3 months in 2020, young children made up 35.7 percent of & # 39; e calls related to cleaners and 46.9 percent of calls related to disinfectants.

In one case, the CDC wrote about a preschool that was found unanswered by his or her parents and taken to the hospital by ambulance.

Her family said she accidentally took something from a 64-ounce bottle of ethanol-based sanitizer in the kitchen, became dizzy, fell and hit her head.

In another case, an adult woman developed short breathing and wheezing after hearing the news to clean all the groceries before eating.

To enjoy her products, she filled a wash with a mixture of 10 percent bleach solution, vinegar and hot water.

"She … was noted to have mild hypoxemia (low oxygen levels in the blood and end-expiratory wheezing. She improved with oxygen and bronchodilators," the authors wrote.

In addition to the report, the CDC has released an image of how you can prevent and safely clean up the spread of coronavirus.

This includes following label directions, do not mix chemicals, wear protective gear, ensure proper ventilation and keep products out of reach of children.

. (tagsToTranslate) dailymail (t) health (t) Coronavirus (t) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

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