Neo-Nazis stole nearly 25,000 email credentials from the WHO, NIH and Gates Foundation and used them to create a & # 39; harassage campaign & # 39; when sharing consonants with coronavirus

  • Security experts discovered nearly 25,000 email leaks online
  • The references belonged to WHO, NIH and the Gates Foundation
  • It turns out they were stolen by extreme extremists and posted in hate forums
  • The event focused on disseminating coronavirus conspiracy theories
  • Here you can help people who are not affected by Covid-19

Nearly 25,000 e-mail addresses and passwords belonging to staff at the World Health Organization, Gates Foundation and the National Institute of Public Health were obtained and posted online by right-wing activists.

The data dump was discovered by SITE Intelligence Group, which tracks the online activity of white supremacist and jihadist groups, which said the leak was an attempt by the # 19-pandemic weapon. & # 39;

Although the origins are unclear, experts found the information on 4chan, a message board known for hateful content, such as Twitter and the far-right extremist channel on & # 39; s messaging app Telegram, the Washington Post reported.

The information gathered by the hackers and neo-Nazi groups was taken with the sole purpose of sharing coronavirus conspiracy theories, including the linking of HIV to the virus.

The World Health Organization confirmed to DailyMail.com that email addresses registered in external systems and applications were hacked and made public, but passwords have since been recovered for the compromised accounts.

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Nearly 25,000 email addresses and passwords belonging to staff at the World Health Organization, Gates Foundation and the National Institutes of Health were obtained online and posted by right-wing activists

A smaller amount of referrals was found to be linked to the Gates Foundation, a private philanthropic group whose co-founder, Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates, announced $ 150 million in new funding last week to combat the pandemic.

DailyMail.com has reached out to NIH and the Gates Foundation for comment and has not yet received a response.

The World Health Organization (WHO) list was 2,732 in total.

& # 39; Yesterday, on April 21, WHO email addresses registered in external systems and applications were hacked and made public, & # 39; a WHO spokeswoman told DailyMail.com.

While the origin is unclear, experts found the information on 4chan, a message board known for hateful content, such as Twitter and the extreme right channel on the Telegram messaging app

Although the origins are unclear, experts found the information on 4chan, a message board known for hateful content, such as Twitter and the extreme right channel on the Telegram messaging app

& # 39; Of 6,835 e-mail addresses that were made public, there were 2,712 WHO e-mail addresses, of which 457 were valid and active addresses.

& # 39; The WHO cyber security team has implemented a verification program to check the exposed email addresses and passwords against authentication services and found that none of & # 39; e 457 WHO reference was compromised.

& # 39; As a precaution, passwords are now reset for the 457 users whose email addresses were left. & # 39;

SITE told Business Insider that the information was used by the extremist groups to disseminate bad information and conspiracy theories about the coronavirus.

Rita Katz, the executive director of SITE, said that & # 39; neo-Nazis & white supremacists & # 39; the information & # 39; aggressive & # 39; published on various online platforms, and used it to call & # 39; a harassage campaign while sharing conspiracy theories about the coronavirus pandemic. & # 39;

& # 39; The breakdown of these proven email representations was just another part of a months-long initiative on the extreme right to arm the COVID-19 pandemic.

& # 39; Keep in mind the objectives of these lists: NIH, CDC, WHO – these are precisely the types of organizations that & # 39; t neo-Nazis and white supremacists are centered on & # 39; a crisis. & # 39;

WHO says lifting virus closures is too rapid & # 39; deadly resurrection & # 39; can indicate

A hasty lifting of restrictions imposed to control the COVID-19 pandemic could lead to fatal resurgence of the new coronavirus, the World Health Organization has warned.

WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said it was working with countries on ways in which lockdowns could be gradually granted, but said it could be too dangerous too soon.

& # 39; I know some countries are already transitioning plans to stay at home. WHO wants restrictions to be lifted as much as everyone else, & # 39; he told a virtual press conference in Geneva.

& # 39; At the same time, lifting restrictions could quickly lead to a deadly resurrection. The road down can be just as dangerous as the road goes up if it is not managed properly.

& # 39; WHO is working with affected countries on strategies to gradually and safely reduce restrictions. & # 39;

WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, pictured at a news conference, has warned that lifting coronavirus restrictions could result in a quick recovery

WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, pictured at a news conference, has warned that lifting coronavirus restrictions could result in a quick recovery

The global death toll has now reached 100,000, and more than 1.6 million infections have been detected worldwide since the virus first emerged in China in December.

Tedros welcomed signs that the virus has spread in some of Europe's most hit countries – namely Spain, Italy, Germany and France.

But he also warned of an & # 39; alarming acceleration & # 39; of the virus in some countries, and marked Africa, where he said the virus began to spread to rural areas.

& # 39; We now see clusters of cases and community spread across more than 16 countries & # 39; on the continent, he said.

& # 39; We expect a lot of difficulties for overly-tight health systems, especially in rural areas, which usually do not lack the resources of those in cities. & # 39;

Tedros also sent his best wishes to British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, who was moved out of intensive care when he fought the coronavirus.

. (tagsToTranslate) dailymail (t) sciencetech (t) World Health Organization (t) Coronavirus

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