NASA engineers are designing a mass-produced ventilator tailored to patients with coronavirus in just 37 days that uses one-seventh of the parts that are not needed for a conventional ventilator

  • Fan machines are currently lacking in hospitals around the world
  • The & # 39; VITAL & # 39; is intended to replace conventional ventilators in less severe cases
  • On Tuesday, the device passed a critical test at & # 39; e Icahn School of Medicine, NY
  • NASA engineers are seeking fast FDA approval for the use of VITAL in hospitals
  • Here you can help people who are not affected by Covid-19

NASA engineers have designed a mass-produced ventilator for COVID-19 patients in just 37 days – one with only a seventh of & # 39; parts of a conventional ventilator.

The & # 39; Fan Intervention Technology Accessible Local & # 39; (VITAL) device passed a critical test at & # 39; the Icahn School of Medicine on & # 39; e Mount Sinai in New York.

The engineers at NASA's California Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) developed the VITAL to free traditional ventilators for the patients with the worst symptoms.

Traditional ventilators are currently in short supply in American hospitals, because they are worldwide in many health care facilities.

NASA engineers have designed a mass-produced ventilator for COVID-19 patients in just 37 days – one with only a seventh of & # 39; parts of a conventional ventilator. Pictured, the & # 39; Fan Intervention Technology Accessible Locally & # 39; (VITAL) device passed a critical test at & # 39; the Icahn School of Medicine on & # 39; e Mount Sinai in New York.

Engineers at NASA's California Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) developed the pictured VITAL to free traditional ventilators for patients with the worst symptoms

Engineers at NASA's California Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) developed the pictured VITAL to free traditional ventilators for patients with the worst symptoms

& # 39; We specialize in spaceships, not medical device manufacturing – but excellent engineering, rigorous testing and rapid prototyping are some of our specialties, & # 39; said JPL Director Michael Watkins.

& # 39; When people at JPL realized that maybe they needed what they needed to support the medical community and the wider community, they felt it was their duty to share their ingenuity, expertise, and drive. ;

Engineers at & # 39; NASA are currently seeking fast-track approval for using VITAL on & # 39; a coronavirus front line by the US Food and Drug Administration.

As with conventional ventilators, VITAL devices require patients to be sedated and an oxygen tube inserted into their airways to breathe.

The new device would not replace current hospital ventilators – built to last years and able to handle a much wider range of medical issues, unlike the COVID-19 custom VITAL, which useful life of about three to four months.

& # 39; Intensive care units see COVID-19 patients who do not need highly dynamic ventilators, & # 39; said NASA's Chief Health and Medical Officer. J.D. Polk.

& # 39; The intention with VITAL is to reduce the chance that patients move to that advanced stage of & # 39; e disease and need more advanced ventilator assistance. & # 39;

VITAL is designed for faster manufacturing and easier maintenance than a traditional ventilator – and uses only a seventh of & # 39; parts, many of which are available in existing supply chains.

It is also flexible enough that it can easily be adapted for use in field hospitals that are not set up in such places as hotels and convention centers around the world.

& # 39; We specialize in spaceships, not medical device manufacturing - but excellent engineering, rigorous testing and rapid prototyping are some of our specialties, & # 39; said JPL Director Michael Watkins. & # 39; When people at JPL realized that they might need something to support the medical community and the wider community, they felt it was their duty to share their ingenuity, expertise, and drive.

& # 39; We specialize in spaceships, not medical device manufacturing – but excellent engineering, rigorous testing and rapid prototyping are some of our specialties, & # 39; said JPL Director Michael Watkins. & # 39; When people at JPL realized that they might need something to support the medical community and the wider community, they felt it was their duty to share their ingenuity, expertise, and drive.

NASA engineers are currently seeking fast-track approval for the use of VITAL on & # 39; coronavirus frontline of & # 39; e American Food and Drug Administration

NASA engineers are currently seeking fast-track approval for the use of VITAL on & # 39; coronavirus frontline of & # 39; e American Food and Drug Administration

To gain input on VITAL & # 39; s design and performance of a gold standard medical device, NASA provided a prototype device to the Icahn School of Medicine, where it went through its pace.

& # 39; We were very pleased with the results of & # 39; & # 39; Tests we & # 39; ve performed in our high-fidelity human simulation lab, & # 39; Icahn School of Medicine Director Matthew Levin said.

& # 39; The & # 39; prototype e NASA performed as expected under a wide variety of simulated patient conditions. & # 39;

& # 39; The team feels confident that the VITAL ventilator will be able to ventilate patients who do not suffer from COVID-19 both here & # 39; e United States or across the globe, & # 39; he concluded.

The California Institute of Technology, which oversees JPL, plans to offer free licenses for VITAL and is seeking manufacturers to mass produce the devices.

To gain input on VITAL & # 39; s design and performance of a gold standard medical device, NASA provided a prototype device to Icahn School of Medicine, where it was tested.

To gain input on VITAL & # 39; s design and performance of a gold standard medical device, NASA provided a prototype device to Icahn School of Medicine, where it was tested.

. (tagsToTranslate) dailymail (t) sciencetech (t) California (t) Coronavirus (t) Nasa

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