Happy elephant! Eating fermented fruits gets elephants DRUNK – but spicy shrews and koala's can hold their alcohol, study finds

  • Canadian scientists discovered the lack of genetic mutation of an elephant named A294 V
  • This is present in humans and other species and makes the processing of alcohol possible
  • Ending a long-standing debate over whether elephants are drunk from fallen fruit

African elephants can be drunk by eating the rotting fruit of & # 39; marula tree – a favorite snack of & # 39; the world's tallest land animal – according to a team of Canadian researchers.

The earthly giants do not miss a genetic mutation that allows them to process alcohol that is not seen in other animals, including humans, koalas, cracks and some bat species.

As a result, African elephants' propensity for the fermenting manulet, which is used to make beer, quickly causes them to become drunk.

Debate over whether elephants are actually drunk has long been raging among scientists, with some accusers in favor of & # 39; the theory of & # 39; humanizing & # 39; the animals.

But a study of elephant genes has found the underlying genetic key, which elephants simply fail to keep their alcohol.

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African elephants' propensity for the fermenting manila fruit, which is used to make beer, causes them to become drunk, according to a team of Canadian researchers

The gene in question is called A294 V and allows humans and other large apes to process alcohol quickly.

Its presence in other species is linked to a high tolerance for alcohol.

The unassuming pen-tailed treeshrew, for example, consumes fermented nectar that does not contain enough ethanol (alcohol) to numb a human.

But despite being just 4 inches (10 cm) long and waking up just 0.07 per cent of an average human, it shows & # 39; no signs of inebriation & # 39 ;, researchers said.

Egyptian fruit bats became light weights when it came to drinking, drinking alcohol as weak as one percent.

While "leaf-nosed" bumps, also known as Phylostomid buds, found in North and South America, are not affected by alcohol.

African elephants can be drunk by eating the rotting fruit of & # 39; the marula tree (pictured), a favorite snack of the & # 39; s heaviest land animal. e world. The earthly giants lack a genetic mutation that allows them to process alcohol

African elephants can be drunk by eating the rotting fruit of & # 39; the marula tree (pictured), a favorite snack of the & # 39; s heaviest land animal. e world. The earthly giants lack a genetic mutation that allows them to process alcohol

Everyone in Sweden has also found signs of drunkenness from eating only a few rotten apples that haven't started fermenting.

According to folklore, African elephants throughout Africa keep their diet on & # 39; the fallen fermented fruit of & # 39; a marula tree, which is not used to make beer.

Earlier research has supported the reimbursement. For example, Professor Steve Morris and colleagues at the University of Bristol calculated that an elephant would need to drink 27 liters (47 pints) of fermented fruit juice at seven percent strength to demonstrate drunken behavior.

They suggested that the elephants should eat large amounts of "fallen fruit", in order that each would not likely reach more than three percent alcohol content from fermentation on & # 39; e ground.

Canadian researchers writing in a study published in Biology Letters now believe that the folk stories can be anything but correct.

Human alcohol tolerance is caused by evolutionary changes, but in other animals the ability to drink alcohol is not well understood.

The researchers said that elephants lack A294 V behind drunkenness.

They said this suggests that & # 39; conclusions about the amount of ethanol needed to produce symptoms of inebriation in an African elephant were probably wrong and the myth of inebriation may well be underpinned & # 39;

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