The world has on average seen a six percent drop in greenhouse gases amid the & # 39; coronavirus pandemic due to lockdowns & shutdowns & # 39; a sector.

Although levels rise to new records this time last year, the downturn is still not significant enough to stop climate change, warns the United Nations weather agency.

Experts say that once the world economy begins to recover, emissions will return to normal and continue to contribute to climate change.

They also foresee a surge in emissions because many companies have completely stopped production in the outbreak.

Experts say that once the world economy begins to recover, emissions will return to normal and continue to contribute to climate change. They also foresee a surge in emissions because many industries have stopped production in a very long time, such as those in China

The coronavirus began in December 2019 in Wuhan, China and has since spread to almost every country in the world.

As of Thursday, there were more than 2.5 million cases and the death toll exceeded 174,000.

Since the outbreak, many countries have implemented stay-at-home implementations and the closure of several companies.

The decline in human activity has caused a drop in carbon dioxide levels across the globe, including major gas generators such as India, parts of Europe and China.

But Professor Petteri Taalas, Secretary General of the & # 39; Meteorological Organization (WMO), said & # 39; This drop in emissions of six per cent, which is unfortunately (only) good news in the short term. & # 39;

& # 39; D & # 39; can even give a boost to emissions to & # 39; some of & # 39; e industries have stopped. & # 39;

Since the outbreak, many countries have implemented stay-at-home implementations and the closure of several companies. As of Thursday, there have been more than 2.5 million cases and the death toll has exceeded 174,000 worldwide

Since the outbreak, many countries have implemented stay-at-home implementations and the closure of several companies. As of Thursday, there have been more than 2.5 million cases and the death toll has exceeded 174,000 worldwide

WMO recently released data to coincide with Earth Day's 50th anniversary, which was held Wednesday.

The data shows that from 2015 to 2019 levels of carbon dioxide were 18 percent higher than the previous five years.

The report notes that greenhouse gases have been in the & # 39; e atmosphere and oceans remain. This means that the world is committed to continuing climate change, despite any temporary drop in emissions due to the Coronavirus epidemic. & # 39;

The predicted decline in carbon emissions is reflected by reductions in levels of normal air pollution from car exhaust and fossil fuel energy, such as nitrogen oxide (N2O) particles.

& # 39; Their life is typically from days to weeks, so the impact is seen faster & # 39 ;, Taalas said. & # 39; But these changes in & # 39; e carbon emissions, so far they have had no impact on climate. & # 39;

He also noted that air quality is dramatically improving in industrial cities.

& # 39; In China, India and also here with us in & # 39; e Po Valley in northern Italy, which is one of & # 39; s most polluted areas in Europe. And we have seen that in individual cities like Paris. & # 39;

The report notes that greenhouse gases have been in the & # 39; e atmosphere and oceans remain. This means the world is committed to continuing climate change, despite any temporary drop in emissions due to the Coronavirus epidemic & # 39;

The report notes that greenhouse gases have been in the & # 39; e atmosphere and oceans remain. This means the world is committed to continuing climate change, despite any temporary drop in emissions due to the Coronavirus epidemic & # 39;

The WMO Secretary-General noted that, unless the world can mitigate climate change, it will lead to & # 39; persistent health problems, especially hunger and inability to cope with the growing population of & # 39; to lead the world and there would also be more massive impact on economy & # 39 ;.

Since the first Earth Day in 1970, carbon dioxide levels have risen by 26 percent, and the world's average temperature has increased by 33.5 degrees Fahrenheit.

The planet is also almost 34 degrees hotter than the pre-industrial era – a trend that is not expected to continue.

In its latest report warning of the effects of climate change, the UN agency confirmed that it was the hottest on record for the last five years.

However, global warming has been uneven.

Europe experienced its warmest temperatures in the last 10 years, which were about 32.9 degrees higher than the average, but South America saw the slightest change.

There are other important indicators that have shown an acceleration of climate change over the past five years.

These include ocean warming and acidification, rising sea level glacier melt and Arctic and Antarctic sea ice shedding (with ice loss five times higher in the past five years, compared to the 1970s).

. (tagsToTranslate) dailymail (t) sciencetech (t) coronavirus (t) Climate change and global warning

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