The death toll of the UK's coronavirus has increased by 3,811 to 26,097 now that the government has started counting people who died in nursing homes or in their own homes – but the appointment still falls thousands short of & # 39; # 39; a reality.

Today is the first time the Department of Public Health has people dying outside hospitals in their daily statistics, and the backdated numbers have added thousands to their death toll, which was just 21,678.

But a larger flow was expected. The National Statistics Office reports that more than 6,000 people are known to have died in nursing homes, and the Health Care Commission reported 4,300 in just two weeks.

However, the government will only include people who have tested positive for the virus in its statistics, despite rationing nearly all test kits to hospitals for the first month of the outbreak, meaning thousands of people may have died without ever being diagnosed.

The ONS and CQC put out even more reliable, but slower statistics, which include reports of people who were suspected of having the disease but were never diagnosed and, as a result, the number of people dying outside hospitals significantly higher.

US data suggest that the actual number of victims may be 55 percent higher than the government has left, already putting the figure at more than 40,000. Records in Scotland meanwhile mean hospital deaths now account for just 52 per cent of deaths, suggesting the true number is 43,000. The Financial Times estimates that 47,000 people have already died.

The & # 39; data of & # 39; However, health today suggests that hospital patients still account for 83 percent of all deaths – something that is not celebrated by other statistics that are not published in the UK.

Britain today announced 765 more hospital patients to the coronavirus, of which about 600 died in hospitals. NHS England announced 445 more victims, including a healthy 14-year-old, added to 83 declared in Scotland and 73 in Wales.

It comes as the number of people known to have died in nursing homes is increasing and one University of Cambridge expert said people may now die more strongly in homes than in hospitals.

The professor, a highly regarded statistical expert and an OBE recipient, spoke of & # 39; massive, unusual spikes & # 39; in & # 39; number of fatalities in nursing homes and said there was no evidence that nursing homes were over the worst of & # 39; e outbreak, as the rest of & # 39; land is believed to be.

He told MailOnline today's updated death toll was not high enough and the truth was & # 39; at least so much & # 39 ;, which totaled over 30,000.

Government ministries, pressed on claims that they were not doing enough to help nursing homes, and care was not & # 39; not overlooked & # 39; during a shrink to protect the NHS. Environment Secretary George Eustice said of & # 39; tomorrow & # 39; we have always recognized that there was more vulnerability. He denied that more testing would have saved lives.

In other news about coronavirus:

  • Schools will reopen in a & # 39; phase approach & # 39; which means not all children will return at the same time, said Education Secretary Gavin Williamson. He did not say when & # 39; t this could start;
  • Dominic Cummings, the No. 10 chief counsel, is reputed to be & # 39; more like a stay & # 39; has played during his controversial attendance at meetings of the & # 39; scientific advisory group of & # 39; a government, SAGE;
  • A drug developed for Ebola, remdesivir, has shown promising results in an early trial on 397 severely ill COVID-19 patients, according to its manufacturer, Gilead;
  • British travel agent TUI has canceled all holiday bookings for the next six weeks;
  • Windsor and Maidenhead Borough Council may need to file for bankruptcy because it has now lost so much money that tourism is not allowed under coronavirus protection rules;
  • Midwives and social workers from abroad will be automatically granted a visa renewal for a maximum of one year, allowing them to continue working during the coronavirus crisis.

The Department of Public Health has begun today to collect data on deaths that do not occur anywhere, as long as the person tests positive for COVID-19 before or after they die. The new record has seen 3,811 backdated deaths added to Britain's death toll, but is still not believed to show the hot picture

Analysis of data from the Bureau of National Statistics shows that, while the number of hospital deaths is reported to have decreased (blue bar), the number of deaths recorded outside hospitals - especially in nursing homes - has increased (red bar) ). The data used is backdated and counted by actual date of death, which makes them appear more stable than the wrong numbers announced every day by the Department of Health, which are counted by the date that they are registered

Analysis of data from the Bureau of National Statistics shows that, while the number of hospital deaths is reported to have decreased (blue bar), the number of deaths recorded outside hospitals – especially in nursing homes – has increased (red bar) ). The data used is backdated and counted by actual date of death, which makes them appear more stable than the wrong numbers announced every day by the Department of Health, which are counted by the date that they are registered

Speaking about the current data collection of & # 39; update, Professor Spiegelhalter told MailOnline: & # 39; It's actually much more than that (3,811).

& # 39; The true number is probably up there as much as it added today, which would take well over 30,000. They do their best and it's a lot better than what we got, but it's still not the complete picture.

& # 39; When you place (these) two datasets (ONS and CQC) together, the new data that is not reported (missing) still lacks a good hundred deaths each day. & # 39;

FREE HOUSING INSTITUTIONS OF A FASTER RATE OF HOSPITAL PATIENTS IN SCOTLAND

People who die in hospitals but only half of the coronavirus deaths in Scotland have data available, and people are now dying more rapidly in nursing homes than they are in hospitals.

A report published today by the National Records of Scotland has shed light on the devastating toll COVID-19 is taking on residents of nursing homes.

Of the 656 people who died of the coronavirus between April 20 and 26, 338 (52 percent) died in nursing homes, while 276 (42 percent) died in hospitals. The remaining 42 happened in someone's own home as elsewhere.

And the same data showed that, by On April 26, 2,272 people were confirmed to have died with COVID-19.

Some 1,188 of these (52 percent) were hospital patients, while 886 (39 percent) died in nursing homes. A further 198 (9 percent) died at home as elsewhere.

Separate data released today by the National Records of Scotland has made it very clear that the deaths of hospitals announced every day by government officials, but shows a fraction of reality.

National data shows that hospital patients made up only 52 percent of all deaths, while 39 percent happened in nursing homes and 11 percent elsewhere. When they together Scotland's total deaths for April 26 were added almost doubled from 1,262 to 2,272.

Nursing homes, which are probably still in the grip of the coronavirus, are disaster strikes and the government is heavily criticized for alleged failures to help prepare the sector.

In England and Wales, the number of residents dying from each cause has almost doubled in one month, from about 2,500 a week in March to 7,300 in a single week in April – more than 2,000 of the last COVID-19 cases confirmed.

Healthcare Quality Commission (CQC) reports suggest that nursing homes now see about 400 coronavirus deaths each day, on average – a number equal to hospitals in the UK.

The way data is backdated means that the true picture of what happens in nursing homes is unclear, as we currently only have statistics from two weeks ago.

The true scale of the crisis is also masked by a lack of routine testing, which means that hundreds of older residents may have died without ever being diagnosed.

Professor John Newton, the test manager of the & # 39; government, yesterday stated that officials had been working on & # 39; Assuming that if one person tested positive for COVID-19 in a home, someone else who developed symptoms would probably also have and did not need testing.

Public Health England data has revealed that almost a third of all nursing homes in the country have reported their coronavirus outbreaks.

THIRD OF RESIDENTS DE OR COVID-19 AT CARE HOMES IN ESSEX AND PETERBOROUGH

Nearly a third of residents died at a 22-bed Essex nursing home and an 18-person facility in Peterborough.

Jenny Smith, director of care at Westcliff Lodge Care Home in Westcliff-on-Sea, Essex, revealed the devastating impact that coronavirus has on the nursing home.

& # 39; We are all still adjusting and trying to process the loss, & # 39; told them earlier this month at BBC Breakfast.

& # 39; The loss and the pain and the destruction. We also have many people ill with suspected COVID, so we have been under enormous pressure.

 & # x20AC; & # x153; There is so much fear in the staff, because this is a virus that affects people of all ages, and that is a really primary difference really compared to normal levels of influence. 39;

About a third of residents at Westcliff Lodge Care Home, Essex, died during Cooutbreak

About a third of residents at Westcliff Lodge Care Home, Essex, died of coronavirus outbreaks

Some 85 percent of caregivers at the virus hit nursing home in Peterborough (pictured) have fallen ill or have to self-insulate after they come in contact with carriers

Some 85 percent of caregivers at the virus hit nursing home in Peterborough (pictured) have fallen ill or have to self-insulate after they come in contact with carriers

Meanwhile, at least six people have died at the Philia Care Home in Peterborough.

Earlier this month, the daughter of one of the & # 39; s victims said the state nursing homes in & # 39; a house was left & # 39; evil & # 39 ;.

Rhona White, 64 – whose mother Peggy Grainger, 86, had read a moving last letter from her family to her, saying they were unable to visit – said: "The very situation is just criminal . People are allowed to die in these houses and no one really cares.

Some 85 percent of caregivers at Philia Care Home in Peterborough have fallen ill or had to isolate themselves after they contacted carriers.

Manager Heidi Seldon, who & # 39; s moved into the home to sleep in her office, said: & # 39; What I was not prepared for was how difficult it would be to emotionally look at so many of my residents who do not suffer from coronavirus.

& # 39; We are just trying to keep ourselves together and hope that there will be some light to & # 39; an end of & # 39; a tunnel. & # 39;

Some 4,516 homes had reported cases of the virus between March 17 and April 27, representing about 29 percent of all homes.

The North East of England is the least affected, with four in 10 of its care homes affected (291 in total), followed by the North West (36 percent) and London (33 percent).

Government ministers now have to dismiss allegations that they left the 400,000 people who did not live in nursing homes in the den the early stages of Britain's epidemic when it focused its efforts on NHS hospitals.

Chief government scientist Sir Patrick Vallance acknowledged this week that Whitehall & # 39; very early & # 39; was told – believed to be in late January or early February – that nursing homes would be a danger zone. The government has been accused of & # 39; shambolic & # 39; and accidental attempts to support the sector since then and the initial death was not announced until March 31.

The CQC said a total of 4,343 people with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 died in nursing homes between April 10 and April 24 alone.

US statistics released yesterday show that more than a quarter of all COVID-19 deaths occur outside hospitals – by April 17, there were 4,316 non-hospital deaths out of a total of 19,112.

Almost three-quarters of people living in nursing homes have dementia, making them extremely vulnerable, and many have other serious health problems.

Professor Spiegelhalter said: & # 39; While COVID's death in hospitals has been steadily declining since April 8, now counting around 400-450 per day, new data from & # 39; The Healthcare Quality Commission showed that last week there were approximately 350-400 COVID deaths in English nursing homes each day.

& # 39; When we add deaths at home, this suggests that there are now almost as many COVID deaths from hospital as in hospital. And although hospital deaths are steadily diminishing, there is still no sign that we are past the peak in nursing homes. & # 39;

Speaking yesterday to BBC Radio 4, he added, & # 39; what is sticking out my neck & # 39; that actually happened more outside hospitals.

As more detail emerges that shows how hard nursing homes have been hit by the virus, the government faces growing pressure to explain its actions and apparent lack of support.

Although nursing homes are not run by the government and many are owned by private, profit-making companies, they house hundreds of thousands of the country's most vulnerable people and have close ties to local councils, which do not include fees. for fees financed, and NHS services.

Politicians have come back against claims that the healthcare sector was overlooked.

Environment Secretary George Eustice told BBC Radio 4 today: & # 39; I do not accept that it was overlooked, but of course there was a real focus on our NHS, to not worry that it might be overwhelming and we want to make sure they have absolutely everything they need.

& # 39; But in the case of nursing homes, we always recognized that there was more vulnerability. & # 39;

Asked if tests that were not previously available to healthcare workers cost lives, Mr Eustice told BBC Breakfast: & # 39; I do not think it is that we have worked very closely with the healthcare sector and they have had very clear protocols in place.

& # 39; To deal with that staff with obviously very vulnerable cohort, the elderly, sometimes people with other conditions, if they do not show symptoms, then they do not need to be at work.

& # 39; Of course, testing helps and we are now able to roll out those tests. & # 39;

Data from National Records of Scotland today showed that COVID-19 death rates are almost twice as high as deaths outside hospitals - about 48 percent of & # 39; e deaths occurred in nursing homes or private residences

Data from National Records of Scotland today showed that COVID-19 death rates are almost twice as high as deaths outside hospitals – about 48 percent of & # 39; e deaths occurred in nursing homes or private residences

Twenty-two residents die in single Scottish nursing homes

At least 20 residents died of the coronavirus this month at the Berelands Care Home in Prestwick, Ayrshire.

By April 17, 20 people had undergone an illness, of which four people died in one 24-hour period when headphones hit the house because of the tragedy.

One resident died on April 17, and three had died the day before. 16 others had died in the days and weeks prior.

A spokeswoman said at the time: & # 39; We are deeply saddened to confirm that four more residents have died from what we are COVID-19.

At least 20 people died in the Berelands Care Home in Scotland

At least 20 people died in the Berelands Care Home in Scotland

& # 39; This is very upsetting, and our deepest sympathies are with their families and friends.

& # 39; We are fully focused on caring for and protecting all of our residents and are extremely grateful to our dedicated staff who do their absolute best at this exceptionally difficult time. & # 39;

Until recently, test head Professor Newton explained, a small number of tests would be performed at a nursing home if there was a suspected outbreak. If a resident or staff tested positive, the outbreak would be recognized and anyone else who became ill would be assumed to be infected but not test.

This has now changed and anyone who doesn't live or work in a home, whether they have symptoms or not, will be able to get a free swab test to find out if they have the disease.

However, Professor Newton said that a & # 39; substantial & # 39; number of people has already died.

He said on LBC: & # 39; We always knew that part of & # 39; There have been cases in nursing homes. Unfortunately, coronavirus affects older people a lot more … there will be a substantial number (of deaths). & # 39;

If Office for National Statistics data is a reliable indicator of what's coming, the total death toll in the country could increase by up to 55 percent.

As of Tuesday, the official death toll of the coronavirus in the United Kingdom stood at 21,678 in Britain, following England, Scotland and Wales announcing a further 586 deaths in hospitals.

But an ONS report showed that the true scale of the outbreak may be 54.6 percent higher, due to the & # 39; A Department of Health does not include people who die outside hospitals.

The statistics body found that, on April 17, England and Wales had been included 22,351 coronavirus deaths – a significant rise to 14,451 counted by health chiefs. If the same increase – 54.6 per cent – was applied to & # 39; the current UK death toll (21,678), it could mean the actual number of victims in & # 39; e region is of 33,500.

ONS data, which is released each week and provides the only true picture of how many people have died outside hospitals, registered 3,096 COVID-19 deaths from nursing homes by April 17.

This was almost triple the 1,043 total announced the week before, with 2,000 new deaths in the space of a week.

Hospitals in England now report around 400 COVID-19 linked deaths per day - about the same number as in nursing homes. But Sir David Spiegelhalter, a statistician at the University of Cambridge, warned that due to the deaths of nursing homes, all those in hospitals may have overwritten

FIFTEEN RESIDENTS DIE AT DURHAM CARE HOME

Fifteen people are reported to have died at the Stanley Park Care Home in Durham, after they were suspected of catching the coronavirus.

Chronicle Live reported the death of a 15th resident a week ago.

The home, which has room for 71 residents, had suffered another 14 deaths in the previous weeks, but had not officially tested any residents.

Regional Director of Care UK, who runs the house, Karen Morrison, said: "It is with great regret that I must say another resident has died after symptoms of this ; t indicate coronavirus. & # 39;

Staff and residents at the house snapped headlines as they sang heart-warming footage of their appeared classic wartime songs to raise their spirits.

Vera Lynn homage act Deborah Taylor-Smith, known as the Geordie Sweetheart & # 39; Wor Vera & # 39;, this month sang a selection of morally-uplifting songs such as & # 39; We Will Meet Again & # 39; and & # 39; White Cliffs of Dover & # 39; to entertain the residents.

A caretaker in PPE and a resident enjoy the songs. The singer said, & # 39; I raised morale, I feel a bit like Vera Lynn may have felt & # 39;

A caretaker in PPE and a resident enjoy the songs. The singer said, & # 39; I raised morale, I feel a little like Vera Lynn may have felt & # 39;

Many of those who die outside hospitals are not tested for the coronavirus while alive, which means that these data show that Britain's outbreak is much larger than it appears, because these people probably not counted in test figures. Some are never officially diagnosed and are only suspected of having the disease.

So many people are killed by the virus that the week from April 11 to April 17 was the deadliest for England and Wales since records began in 1993 and had a death toll (22,351) more than double the annual average (10,497). Four out of every 10 people who died that week were infected with coronavirus.

Mr. Hancock said at the public briefing yesterday: & # 39; From & # 39; Tomorrow we will not only publish the number of deaths in hospitals every day, but the number of deaths in nursing homes and the community as well. & # 39;

& # 39; This will supplement the weekly US & CQC publication and all add to our understanding of how & # 39; this virus spreads day by day, and it will help inform the judgments we & # 39; ll make as we work to keep people safe, & # 39; he said.

The new data will be collected by Public Health England from the USSC and the CQC and will date until the beginning of March. Only test-confirmed cases will be included.

The US will continue to provide the most accurate source of data to anyone who does not mention COVID-19 on their death certificate, whether they were tested or not. The CQC, which regulates nursing homes and hospitals, also includes suspected deaths in a bid to make sure people didn't miss out on tests being unavailable.

This means that both records use a wider network than the NHS – they may include some misdiagnosis, but also include those that were usually never tested.

However, the disadvantage to ONS data is that they are lagging behind and that it takes a long time to record, which means that it is 10 days out of date by the time it is published.

It also does not include Scotland or Northern Ireland, which does not have their own records.

A graph presented by the government at the briefing yesterday showed that an increasing number of people are dying outside hospitals and, in the week to April 17, victims of nursing homes were about a quarter of the total

A graph presented by the government at the briefing yesterday showed that an increasing number of people are dying outside hospitals and, in the week to April 17, victims of nursing homes were about a quarter of the total

County Durham has so far the highest number of COVID-19 deaths in nursing homes with 84, followed by Sheffield (79), Birmingham (71) and Liverpool (67), according to ONS data as of yesterday.

And of the 22,351 people who died on April 17, there were 8,514 in & # 39; ages 80 to 89 years old. A further 3,998 (18 per cent) were 90 or older, and 3,232 (14.5 per cent) were between 79 and 75.

Deaths are decreasing on a sliding scale by the younger age groups, with only 38 people in their 20s (0.17 per cent) undergoing illness, along with nine children and teens (0.04 per cent) ).

The Alzheimer's Society said 70 percent of all people living in nursing homes have dementia, making them especially vulnerable.

Director of Charity Policy, Sally Copley, said: & # 39; Although we are not in & # 39; At least surprised, we are still amazed to hear that nearly a quarter of coronavirus deaths in the UK are now confirmed as coming from nursing homes, and still rising every week, exposing the truly growing scale of & # 39; a crisis that doesn & # 39; t happen in & # 39; e nursing homes of our nation.

WEEKLY CARE HOME DEATH COUNT TRIPLES IN ONE MONTH AMONG THE CORONAVIRUS CRISIS

The number of people who die in nursing homes each week has tripled in a month, according to a shock report.

ONS data shows that 7316 deaths were recorded in homes in England and Wales during the week ending April 17 – including 2,050 involving COVID-19.

In comparison, just 2,471 deaths from each cause were recorded in nursing homes in the week ending March 13 – before the crisis in Britain began to spiral.

But the rate has risen in line with the coronavirus outbreak, jumping to 3,769 in Week 14 (March 27-April 3) and 4,927 in Week 15 (April 3-10).

This means that the official death rate for COVID-19 care homes – registered until April 17 – stands at 3,096 in England and Wales.

But the true figure will probably be much higher, if it does not hold a registration warehouse.

For example, separate figures show the number of nursing home deaths that occurred in England until April 17, but registered by April 25 was 3,936.

Meanwhile, the UK's health regulator – the CQC – says the number of COVID-19 deaths in homes is at least 4,300. This tally includes both suspicious and confirmed cases.

County Durham has so far the highest number of COVID-19 deaths in nursing homes with 84, followed by Sheffield (79), Birmingham (71) and Liverpool (67)

& # 39; With 70 percent of people in nursing homes living with dementia, this pandemic is taking a terrible toll on & # 39; e families with whom we work. The government must ensure that every single death is investigated and counted.

& # 39; We know this is a terrible time for those with loved ones with dementia in nursing homes.

& # 39; People die, alone, because & # 39; it is clear that nursing homes simply do not get the testing and protection equipment they were promised by the government. & # 39;

The sharp focus on the healthcare sector comes after Britain's main scientific adviser, Sir Patrick Vallance, revealed that he and other senior scientists are policing very early & # 39; warn about the risk that COVID-19 poses for nursing homes.

Sir Patrick, who is & # 39; chairman of the group along with Professor Chris Whitty, said that she & # 39; s at risk of outbreaks of healthcare and hospital & # 39; flag & # 39; had at the beginning of & # 39; an epidemic.

While hospital warnings a & # 39; mantra & # 39; protect from & # 39; the NHS & # 39; and a shrinkage to buy ventilators and free beds, nursing homes saw no such effort.

The government has been nominated for its lack of support for nursing homes, with no routine testing, no current records on the number of people infected as dead, and & # 39; paltry & # 39; attempts to provide adequate protective clothing for personnel.

Healthcare staff and residents say they & # 39; forgot & # 39; feel and bosses accuse officials of a & # 39; shambolic & # 39; attempt to help nursing homes protect the disease, which is deadly for the elderly in particular.

Sir Patrick Vallance explained how SAGE Monday works in a briefing, saying: "Very early we looked at a number of issues, we looked very early on nosocomial infection, which is the spread in hospitals, and we flagged that as something the NHS needs to think about.

& # 39; We flag the fact that we thought nursing homes would be an important area to visit, and we flag things like vaccine development and so on. So we try to take things in the longer term and deal with the urgent and immediate areas. & # 39;

The SAGE committee, which calls for leading investigators from the United Kingdom and guns through scientific evidence on COVID-19, was activated on January 3 when Sir Patrick became concerned about the outbreak of coronavirus in Wuhan.

It first met on January 22, suggesting that & # 39; very early & # 39; in their conversations probably the end of January as the beginning of February.

The first nursing home death in England and Wales was only officially listed on March 31.

The Director of Clinical Services of Dementia UK, Paul Edwards, said: & # 39; The fact that we are now only made aware of how important this pandemic has affected people who work and live in nursing homes is testimony to how & # 39; # 39; Social care is viewed – close to being held in the same regard as health care.

& # 39; More PPE equipment, access to testing and funding for example would benefit not only nursing homes, but also a wider society; from ensuring residents of nursing homes are protected, to prevent hospital admissions to improve the mental health of families who may not be concerned that their siblings do not have the support they need. t they are needed. It is time that we see social care as part of health care and vice versa. & # 39;

. (tagsToTranslate) dailymail (t) news (t) UK Government News and updates on the British Cabinet (t) Dominic Raab (t) Downing Street (t) Coronavirus

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