Britain today announced 674 more coronavirus deaths in hospitals, nursing homes and elsewhere, taking the UK's official death toll to 26,711, with Prime Minister Boris Johnson confirming the nation's peak of & # 39; e outbreak is.

NHS England declared 391 victims of COVID-19, while more were reported outside hospitals and in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Amid fears, thousands of victims were missing, ministerial ministers called in to take higher pressure to include COVID-19 deaths in nursing homes in the daily update.

Officials yesterday – the first day of the new recording scheme – added an additional 811 deaths to the & # 39; tally. The revised Count saw that Britain jumped to the third global COVID-19 death toll, and meant that the British daily death toll in April was nine times more.

But top statisticians claimed that the count was still thousands short because only Britons who had positive testing for the virus were included. One leading expert claimed that the true number would be more than 30,000.

In other developments to the crisis of coronavirus today:

  • Boris Johnson is set to lock in that lockdown will remain until June, around the time he collects the cabinet to a & # 39; exit strategy & # 39; to unlock;
  • A report has warned that London's transport network could be crippled if the UK loses lockdown measures after London's Transport for London rounds out 7,000 staff;
  • Ministers have admitted that the government & # 39; probably & # 39; Matt Hancock’s goal will be to fail to run 100,000 tests per day, which it was expected would rain tomorrow;
  • A poll found that two-thirds of the public believe the government acted too late in imposing & # 39; e lockdown;
  • Fresh questions have been raised about the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) amid allegations that it has been influenced by politicians and senior officials;
  • NHS fundraising hero Tom Moore has been promoted to colonel and honored with an RAF flypast to mark his 100th birthday;
  • Top surgeons have warned thousands of people will die on COVID-19 if Britain's strict lockdown ceases at this stage.

PM's exit strategy depends on & # 39; R value

& # 39; The Prime Minister's execution strategy all depends on & # 39; e crucial R value – the rate of infection. This means how many people continue to infect the average patient with the virus.

At the beginning of the outbreak, R was 3. But yesterday, Chief Scientific Adviser Patrick Vallance said it had fallen between 0.6 and 0.9.

Boris Johnson insisted that the number could not go back above 1. He told the press conference: & # 39; Maintaining the R will be absolutely vital. & # 39;

The prime minister played a two-minute video that didn't explain why it was so important to keep it low.

It said that if 100 people had the virus and R was above 1, these people would infect more than 100 others – and rates would increase rapidly.

If R was less than 1, these 100 people would infect less than 100 others which in turn would infect even less and rates would fall.

DATA DATA STILL DOES NOT WANT TO BE DEATH TOLL

Ministers just added 3,811 more deaths to & # 39; the COVID-19 count of & # 39; in the UK, after deaths were recorded in nursing homes or people who did not own their own homes for the first time amid growing pressure to reveal the true scale of the crisis.

Officials have only recorded deaths in hospital since the first death at the beginning of March was recorded.

But top statisticians claimed that the revised toll was still thousands short, and told MailOnline that the truth was & # 39; at least so much again & # 39; and claim that the real number would be 30,000-plus.

Only people who did not test positive for the virus are included in the new statistics, despite ministers who rationed the test kits to the hospitals for the first month of the outbreak.

The Bureau of National Statistics and the Commission on Quality of Health continue to publish more reliable, but slower statistics, which include reports of people who were suspected of having the disease but were never diagnosed and, as a result, the number of people dying outside hospitals is significantly higher.

Professor John Newton, the test manager of the & # 39; government, yesterday stated that officials had been working on & # 39; Assuming that if one person tested positive for COVID-19 in a home, someone else who developed symptoms would probably also have and did not need testing.

ONS reports that more than 3,000 people are known to have died in nursing homes on April 17, while the CQC has registered more than 4,300 in just fourteen weeks in the UK.

Separate data from the US suggest that the actual number of victims may be 55 percent higher than the government has left, and already put the figure at more than 40,000. Records in Scotland meanwhile mean hospital deaths now account for just 52 per cent of deaths, suggesting the true number is 43,000. The Financial Times estimates that 47,000 people have already died.

NHS England revealed today the total number of deaths in hospitals in England had passed another milestone, reaching 20,137.

The & # 39; numbers of & # 39; e health shows that the actual count of England is 23,550, which means that at least 3,413 deaths occurred outside hospitals.

A 15-year-old was among the new 391 victims. Officials said they had an underlying health situation, but it is unclear what this was.

Of today's announced deaths, 140 occurred on Tuesday, April 28, and the remainder were spread over the seven weeks between March 12 and yesterday. April 8 remains the highlight of the outbreak, in which 863 people die.

Wales recorded 22 more deaths today, taking its total number of deaths to 908. Scotland announced a further 60 victims with its death toll to date 1,475. Northern Ireland has yet to declare its number today, but its official count yesterday was 338.

The number of people dying in hospitals in the UK seems to be declining and the government is coming under increasing pressure to reveal how it plans to move Britain out of its current lockdown.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson is expected to speak on the subject later this afternoon and tell the British he will not do anything that risks sending the virus – the R0 – higher and spreading it faster then a one-to-one ratio.

Tomorrow's chairman of the cabinet is expected to expect the prime minister to put an end to & # 39; e draconian restrictions that cripple the economy, and claim that allowing the killer disease again rampant would do even worse damage.

Mr. Johnson will & # 39; R & # 39; number – the reproductive frequency of the virus – at the heart of & # 39; strike, and says he will take no action that & # 39; t rise above it, meaning it is growing.

Sources from the & # 39; government have indicated that he will also defend calls to treat the public like & # 39; adults & # 39; by discussing ways in which the lockdown can be granted, and says it & # 39; is too early & # 39;

But Scottish Prime Minister Nicola Sturgeon, at a briefing today in Edinburgh, said she believed it was & # 39; too early & # 39; would be if the formal review happens next week to limit & # 39; in any meaningful way & # 39; to be lifted.

& # 39; The margins we have to make sure the virus does not recapture are really tight, & # 39; she said.

Ms Sturgeon sounded alarmed that people had already begun to fight the social distance rules – that traffic had increased 10 percent in some parts of Scotland last week.

Despite the hard line in public, frantic behind-the-scenes work has ended at a & # 39; development plan & # 39; to develop. Island communities with controllable transport links are set to be used to test ways to loosen restrictions when refurbishing community tests. The Isle of Wight will be among the first pilot sites.

However, officials have strongly made claims that regions such as Cornwall can be targeted with specific measures.

The appearance of Mr. Johnson at the press release tonight will be his first, since reloading on Downing Street since Monday, and will come less than 36 hours after his fiancée Carrie Symonds gave birth to her son. The prime minister has delayed his paternity until later in the year, in order to prevent the country from fighting the coronavirus outbreak.

His return comes as the Department of Health is set to miss Matt Hancock's goal of conducting 100,000 coronavirus tests per day by the end of this month.

On Tuesday, April 28, the last day for which data was available, 52,429 tests were performed – just half the goal.

CHILDREN ARE ONLY INFECTIOUS AS ADULTS, STUDENTS

Children are just as likely to become infected with the coronavirus as adults and spread it to other people, a study has found.

In research that will come as a blow to Britain's hopes of reopening schools anytime, scientists in China found that children are just as at risk of infection.

How COVID-19 affects young people has been debating experts since the pandemic, so few of them seem to get seriously ill or die after catching the virus.

In the UK, for example, only 10 people under the age of 20 have been infected with COVID-19 in hospitals out of a total of 19,740 – a rate of 0.05 per cent.

This led to speculation that children were somehow protected against the disease or less likely to catch or spread it – something that has driven Chinese research.

The study, done in Shenzhen, found that the & # 39; attack speed & # 39; of the virus among children was 7.4 percent, which was equal to the 6.6 percent seen in the general population.

Professor Simon Clarke, a virus expert at & # 39; e University of Reading, told The Times: & # 39; This is an important paper. It means that we have to be extremely careful.

& # 39; Because children are carriers, schools could re-open from parents, grandparents and teachers to infection and, in turn, contact everyone … they risk a second wave. & # 39;

Of the number done on Tuesday, some 28,539 were done at the dozens of drive-through centers across the country.

Daily available capacity is now around 77,000, but even if ministers can boost that number to 100,000 for tomorrow, it seems highly unlikely that they will be able to nearly double the number of double tests.

Justice Secretary Robert Buckland acknowledged from & # 39; tomorrow that the goal & # 39; probably & # 39; would be missed, because & # 39; he blamed the fact that the government started from a & # 39; low base & # 39; in terms of test capacity.

Experts hit the target as a & # 39; red herring & # 39; that has hindered the response to the outbreak.

NHS providers, who represent trust in health services, launched a scathing attack on Mr Hancock's handling of the situation, saying that the pressure to redirect the number to a & # 39; distraction & # 39; led to chaotic expansion of the regime.

Chris Hopson, CEO of NHS Providers, said members are becoming increasingly frustrated at the lack of clarity about how the test regime for the next phase will be developed.

The government has insisted that lockdown measures cannot be granted unless its five criteria, including manageable infection rates and test capacity, are met.

Mr. Hopson said: & # 39; Testing is one area where & # 39; despite all the work done by trust and the NHS, the health and care system as a whole has struggled to develop an effective, coordinated approach.

& # 39; While we consider the route beyond lockdown, what confidence leaders now need is clarity on the testing regime from here.

& # 39; Setting a goal for some tests before April 30 can have a galvanizing effect. But what's most important is an updated strategy to take us through the lockdown exit. & # 39;

Details and a timeline of an exit strategy is now the number one demand for Downing Street. Education Secretary Gavin Williamson began hinting yesterday that schools could emerge from lockdown in phases.

Mr. Williamson would not be drawn on a fixed date for when schools could resume but excluded the view that they open in & # 39; summer vacation.

He told MPs: & # 39; I expect schools to be opened in a phased manner. I also intend to give schools as much as possible. & # 39;

Schools, colleges and nurseries in the UK closed their doors to the majority of students, except the children of major workers, more than five weeks ago.

Slow Increase Traffic: At 8am peak hour in London today, traffic was up 1% on the same day last week, but down 2% yesterday. Congestion was 50% below average today - almost as high as Monday's busiest day of lockdown yet, when it was 49% below average. That was a 2% increase from last week, according to Tom Tom

Slow Increase Traffic: At 8am peak hour in London today, traffic was up 1% on the same day last week, but down 2% yesterday. Congestion was 50% below average today – almost as high as Monday's busiest day of lockdown yet, when it was 49% below average. That was a 2% increase from last week, according to Tom Tom

UK: Apple data for the UK shows a sharp drop in walking when rainy weather hit on Tuesday and generally low levels of public transport usage

UK: Apple data for the UK shows a sharp drop in walking when rainy weather hit on Tuesday and generally low levels of public transport usage

Scotland versus UK: This graph compares Apple data acquisition data in Scotland (blue) with driving in the UK (red). UK data protection claim applications are in green and public transport in yellow

Scotland versus UK: This graph compares Apple data acquisition data in Scotland (blue) with driving in the UK (red). UK data protection claim applications are in green and public transport in yellow

London: Apple mobility data for London also paint a similar image. Riding this week increased by 2% and walking was up 8% over the weekend during the sunny weather, but fell when rain hit on Tuesday

London: Apple mobility data for London also paint a similar image. Riding this week increased by 2% and walking was up 8% over the weekend during the sunny weather, but fell when rain hit on Tuesday

Masked passengers are seen from & # 39; tomorrow on & # 39; e place at Canning Town underground station in London

Masked passengers are seen from & # 39; tomorrow on & # 39; e place at Canning Town underground station in London

Education is a divergent issue, which means that administrations in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland can make their own decisions about bringing back schools.

But it will be a key focus of & # 39; lockdown exit strategy of & # 39; a UK government, to re-teach learning workers with children free to go back to their jobs and restart the economy.

There seems to be a growing consensus that schools should stagger the return of students to meet expected ongoing social distance rules.

Nicola Sturgeon, the Scottish Prime Minister, has suggested that school classes should be adjusted to seat students at least two meters apart.

OXFORD UNIVERSITY AND ASTRAZENECA WANT MASS PRODUCTION

Pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca has today agreed to mass-produce a COVID-19 vaccine developed by Oxford University scientists.

Human trials of & # 39; experimental jab – called ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 – began last week and the first results are expected in mid-June.

If proven to protect against the deadly virus, the deal will give the UK access to the vaccine & # 39; as early as possible & # 39 ;, the university said today.

Details of & # 39; agreement – described by Health Secretary Matt Hancock as & # 39; very welcome news & # 39; – will be set for the coming weeks.

Both partners today said the venture was not-for-profit and only the costs of production and distribution are covered.

Developing vaccinations can take up to a decade and scientists have said finding an effective job within 18 months & # 39; unusual & # 39; would be.

But researchers around the world are losing track of the goal, with more than 100 candidates in development and some already tested on humans.

Researchers at Imperial College London are planning to test another experimental jab this summer, which doesn't work a bit differently.

They also indicated that classes could be divided into several alternating groups, attending school on different days to maintain numbers. It is thought that a different approach could return to different year groups at different times.

To & # 39; address of & # 39; e committee on education selection, Mr. Williamson suggested that he be on the same page as Ms. Sturgeon.

& # 39; We recognize that the idea that schools all come back on day one with the full addition of students is not realistic or practical, & # 39; he said.

Despite the harsh public messages, there is evidence of broader movements taking place to increase more of the economy's economy. to get a blow.

DIY stores, fast food chains, cafes and garden centers have scaled up their activities, and councils have also been told by ministers to open tips for dismissal.

Ministers are working on a series of workplace manuals with details on how they can look once the lockdown is granted.

Business Secretary Alok Sharma has asked officials to offer advice on how a slow return to work could be safely managed for seven different types of workplaces, including offices, factories and construction sites.

Companies will be told to close canteens and other common spaces, as well as to mean new shift patterns to allow for social distance and reduce the pressure on public transport at peak times.

Office staff are likely encouraged to continue working from home, where possible.

Deputy Chief Medical Officer Jonathan Van-Tam said a partial opening of schools & # 39; in & # 39; was a mix & # 39; but it was & # 39; too early & # 39; to expect early action seen as the burden of social distance within them.

One Whitehall source said that the three weekly review of lockdown measures, thanks to May 7, would only modest changes exist.

& # 39; We are discussing whether we can undo the top button and make things in one or two places more comfortable for the economy, & # 39; added the source. & # 39; But any idea of ​​a comprehensive repeal is just plain wrong. & # 39;

Britain's roads are becoming noticeably busier, which fears the country will dissolve itself against government advice. Pictured is the A102 in Greenwich, south-east London, this morning

Britain's roads are becoming noticeably busier, which fears the country will dissolve itself against government advice. Pictured is the A102 in Greenwich, south-east London, this morning

The Scientific Advisory Group on Emergency & # 39; s Government will provide new evidence to ministers in the coming days, but it is expected to say that the lifting of much of & # 39; e restrictions immediately would lead to the onset of infection.

Surgeons don't warn PM about NHS as & # 39; punchbag & # 39; used to stop economic damage

Top surgeons have warned thousands of people will die from Covid-19 as Britain's strict lockdown ceases at this stage.

The Royal College of Surgeons has warned Prime Minister Boris Johnson against the use of the & # 39; NHS as & # 39; an economic punchbag & # 39 ;, he & # 39; s working on his plan to take Britain back to normalcy.

The RCS said the lockdown at this stage could not be unlocked, because not enough health personnel are being tested and there is not enough PPE available for frontline medics.

Professor Neil Mortensen, President-elect of & # 39; e RCS told the Daily Telegraph: & # 39; Just because the NHS has not been overwhelmed so far does not mean that the government can use the health service as its economic punchbag.

& # 39; It has been a close thing, and to use Boris Johnson's own words & # 39; we started to wrestle it to the floor & # 39; but the virus is certainly not defeated. & # 39;

A source from & # 39; the government said that Mr Johnson & # 39; it will be very clear that we will not do anything that could risk this … because then you are back with the virus exponentially spread and the risk of a second lockdown & # 39 ;.

In more pressure on PM to be cautious, top surgeons have warned thousands of people will die from Covid-19 if lockdown is lifted at this stage.

The Royal College of Surgeons said the NHS does not have a & # 39; punchbag & # 39; should be used to prevent damage to the economy.

The RCS said the lockdown at this stage could not be unlocked, because not enough health personnel are being tested and there is not enough PPE available for frontline medics.

Professor Neil Mortensen, President-elect of & # 39; e RCS told the Daily Telegraph: & # 39; Just because the NHS has not been overwhelmed so far does not mean that the government can use the health service as its economic punchbag.

& # 39; It has been a close thing, and to use Boris Johnson's own words & # 39; we started to wrestle it to the floor & # 39; but the virus is certainly not defeated. & # 39;

At & # 39; press conference of & # 39; On the night of last night, Secretary of State Dominic Raab noted a reported rise in virus cases in Germany, which has compounded his lockdown.

He said a similar uptick in & # 39; the UK & # 39; is a very real risk & # 39;

Traffic levels are down across the country, but the roads were still relatively busy this morning in West London

Traffic levels are down across the country, but the roads were still relatively busy this morning in West London

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