Climate change could slow down hurricanes by two miles per hour, resulting in areas that are no longer hit with strong winds and heavy rain, experts warn

  • Experts used climate models and data from recent storms to study hurricanes
  • The team found that climate change will slow down hurricanes in the future
  • Strong currents will blow through mid-latitude areas and push toward the wrist
  • These may come with weaker mid-latitude perturbations
  • This may result in a slowing down of storms in Asia and the US east coast

Scientists warn that climate change will slow down the movement of hurricanes, resulting in storms that hit areas with strong winds and heavy rain for an extended period of time.

The forecast comes from meteorological data collected since 1950, along with readings of recent storms and future simulations.

The models suggest that the rise in world temperature would create strong currents that would blow through medium-wide areas and push toward the wrist.

Combined with weaker mid-latitude perturbations, storms along the US east coast and in populated areas in Asia could be slowed by two miles per hour.

Scientists warn that climate change will slow down the movement of hurricanes, resulting in storms that will rain longer areas with wind and rain. Pictured is a satellite image of Hurricane Harvey that struck the southern US area in 2017

The analysis was led by Princeton University climatologist Gan Zhang who said: "This is the first study we are aware of that combines physical interpretation and robust modeling evidence to demonstrate that future anthropogenic warming can lead to a significant delay of & # 39; e hurricane movement. & # 39;

The team collected climate trends that have been detected since 1950 and selected six potential global warming patterns.

They then ran 15 different possible initial conditions on each of the six patterns and came up with 90 possible futures.

As Zhang and his colleges ran the 90 simulations, they told the computers to assume that global carbon dioxide fields are forty-five and the average temperature of the planet increased by about 39 degrees Fahrenheit.

The team collected climate trends that have been detected since 1950 and selected six potential global warming patterns. They then ran 15 different possible initial conditions on each of the six patterns and came up with 90 possible futures

The team collected climate trends that have been detected since 1950 and selected six potential global warming patterns. They then ran 15 different possible initial conditions on each of the six patterns and came up with 90 possible futures

This warming level was chosen because experts have predicted it would reach this point in the turn of the century if people did not take action to limit the use of fossil fuels.

& # 39; Our simulations suggest that future anthropogenic warming may lead to a significant delay of & # 39; e hurricane movement, especially in some populated regions & # 39; mid latitude, & # 39; said Zhang.

The data showed that the forward movement of & # 39; storms would slow down by about 2 miles per hour, which is about 10 to 20 percent of & # 39; e typical speeds today, at latitudes near Japan and New York City.

Zhang touched on the powerful storm Hurricane Harvey that swept through the Atlantic in 2017 and moved to Texas and Louisiana.

It caused catastrophic floods, killed 68 and cost the area $ 125 billion in damage.

One reason the storm was so destructive is because it slowed down and stayed longer over land, which is a point discovered by Zhang's models.

Suzana Camargo, the Marie Tharp Lamont Research Professor at the & # 39; Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of & # 39; e Columbia University, which was not involved in this study, said: "Since the occurrence of Hurricane Harvey, there has been a strong interest in the possibility that anthropogenic climate change has contributed to a slower tempo in & # 39; movement of hurricanes. & # 39;

Zhang found that the increase in temperatures would cause westerlies, which are strong currents that blow through medium-sized latitudes and move to the wrist. These may come with weaker mid-latitude perturbations. One reason Hurricane Harvey (pictured) was so devastating is that it didn't move slower and stayed longer over land

Zhang found that the increase in temperatures would cause westerlies, which are strong currents that blow through medium-sized latitudes and move to the wrist. These may come with weaker mid-latitude perturbations. One reason Hurricane Harvey (pictured) was so devastating is that it didn't move slower and stayed longer over land

Zhang found that the increase in temperatures would cause westerlies, which are strong currents that blow through medium-sized latitudes and move to the wrist.

These can come with weaker mid-latitude perturbations – all of which can result in slow storms in populated areas of Asia and the eastern coastal area along the US.

& # 39; In the debate between & # 39; Everything is caused by climate change & # 39; and & # 39; Nothing is caused by climate change & # 39; – what we're doing here is trying to offer that maybe not everything can be directly attributed to climate change, but the opposite isn't good, either, & # 39; Zhang said.

& # 39; We offer some evidence that there may be a delay in translation movement in response to a future surge in & # 39; e order of 4 degrees Celsius.

& # 39; Our findings are supported by physics, as established by our climate models, so that's a new perspective that offers more confidence than we previously had. & # 39;

HOW DO YOU KNOW MESSAGE?

Abundance can occur anywhere in the United States.

The Homeland Security department says it's especially important to be prepared for flooding if you live in an area that is close to water, including in regions near a stream, river, culvert or ocean, or if you are downstream from a levee or dam.

Flooding can happen in any season, but coastal areas in the & # 39; American area are more likely to be in & # 39; t hurricane season.

Midwestern areas are likely to experience flooding in the spring and periods of heavy summer rains.

The following are basic flood survival tips:

  • Do not run or drive through flooded areas.
  • Do not drive over bridges over floods that do not move quickly. Floodwaters can destabilize bridges.
  • Moving to higher ground when a risk of flash flooding is announced.
  • During periods of heavy rainfall, camping does not occur when parked near streams, creeks or rivers.

. (tagsToTranslate) dailymail (t) sciencetech (t) Climate change and global warming

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here