Boris Johnson explained that Britain is taking & # 39; past the highlight & # 39; is a coronavirus – but urge the public to & # 39; continue & # 39; with lockdown to prevent a fresh outbreak.

Led by his first Downing Street briefing since he fell ill, the prime minister said the UK is now on & # 39; e & # 39; downward slope.

In a tribute to the British public, Mr Johnson said the country was a & # 39; uncontrollable and catastrophic & # 39; epidemic had occurred: & # 39; Your effort and sacrifice is working and has been proven to work. & # 39;

But he made hope of a difficult loosening, after it was made clear that a new cure for & # 39; lethal disease would be worse than the current crippling impact on & # 39; e economy.

He said that a & # 39; huge amount of work & # 39; in a & # 39; exit strategy & # 39; went, with the first draft expected to be published next week. Although it is a & # 39; road map & # 39 ;, a menu of options & # 39; will offer how & # 39; the traffic rights in & # 39; a future could be granted, he warned that it would not give timings if they were "dependent on" science.

The tough message came when & # 39; Mr. Johnson said & # 39; R & # 39; number – the rate of reproduction of the virus – at the heart of & # 39; He claimed that nothing could be done to raise it above one, which would mean the outbreak grew again.

Scientific adviser Patrick Vallance told the briefing that he believed the R was currently between 0.6 and 0.9 across the country.

Mr Johnson – whose fiancé Carrie Symonds gave birth to her son yesterday – began by giving a heartfelt thanks to the & # 39; NHS. "I want to thank everyone who did such a good job in my absence, and I want to thank the NHS for so much – including getting me back here and, I might add, a much happier hospital visit yesterday, "he said.

Mr Johnson said: "Families pursue loved ones every day for their time, we grieve for them and with them, but while we grieve, we are strengthened in our decision to defeat this virus to get this homeland back to health, back on his feet. "

In other developments with no end in sight of the crisis:

  • Britain today announced 473 more coronavirus deaths in hospitals, taking the UK's official death toll to 26,570;
  • A report has warned that London's transport network could be crippled when the UK eases lockdown measures after TfL furloughed 7,000 staff;
  • Ministers have admitted that the government & # 39; probably & # 39; Matt Hancock's goal will be to fail to run 100,000 tests per day;
  • A poll found that two-thirds of the public believe the government acted too late in imposing & # 39; e lockdown;
  • Fresh questions have been posed about the SAGE Group amid allegations that it has been influenced by politicians and senior officials;
  • NHS fundraising hero Tom Moore has been promoted to colonel and honored with an RAF flypast to mark his 100th birthday;
  • Top surgeons have warned thousands of people will die from Covid-19 if Britain's strict lockdown is lifted at this stage, saying the NHS should not be used as a & # 39; punchbag & # 39; to prevent economic damage;
  • Germany has said its coronavirus reproduction frequency is 0.76, well below the growth level of one, despite fears about reducing curb edge. But scientists have warned that the UK has less room to maneuver on lockdown, so it doesn't have much less intensive care beds

Boris Johnson wholeheartedly donated to the NHS and urged Britons to & # 39; tonight & # 39; by going & # 39; then & # 39; he led his first Downing Street briefing since he got sick

Boris Johnson today portrayed the president of cabinet at No10 for the first time since he recovered from coronavirus

Boris Johnson today portrayed the president of cabinet at No10 for the first time since he recovered from coronavirus

The last hospital cases slipped

New cases

The last slide given by the & # 39; s government

Scotland: Apple data for Scotland shows that riding activity is slightly higher than the rest of the UK. Riding across the rest of the UK was down 58 percent from Tuesday's baseline compared to 54 percent north of the border on Tuesday. Many areas of Scotland are remote with limited public transport links

Scotland: Apple data for Scotland shows that riding activity is slightly higher than the rest of the UK. Riding across the rest of the UK was down 58 percent from Tuesday's baseline compared to 54 percent north of the border on Tuesday. Many areas of Scotland are remote with limited public transport links

Experts warn the correct & # 39; R0 & # 39; of the UK will remain a mystery until the UK gets a clearer picture of the size of the outbreak

Britain will never truly know the coronavirus reproduction number and will have to squash it if they lift lockdown by trial and error, scientists say.

The reproduction number, also called R0 (R-naugh), shows how many people infect the average patient before they recover.

Scientists say that as long as the rate is above one, the outbreak will continue, in order for the virus to spread even faster than one-on-one in one community.

Chief medical officer Professor Chris Whitty said he believes it is currently between 0.5 and one, which means the epidemic is being forced to slow down.

While the government is trying to bring the country out of its current social distance measures, it must mix and match rule changes in a way that does not keep the R0 as low as possible.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson, who is currently chairing his first Cabinet meeting since he is hospitalized with the virus, is expected to confirm the slow rate of infection and promises that he will prevent anything that the infection case can take higher .

One expert told MailOnline that without a vaccine or herd immunity, monitoring human behavior will be the only way to stop the virus from getting out of control.

And widespread testing, contact tracking and tracking the number of people infected will be the only way officials can get a grip on how fast the disease seems to spread, although most tests in the UK will only be a rough idea to give.

Scottish Prime Minister Nicola Sturgeon earlier jumped the gun at a briefing in Edinburgh, saying she believed it was & # 39; too early & # 39; would be if the formal review happens next week to lift restrictions & # 39; in any meaningful way & # 39 ;. She also raised alarm that people were already explaining the social distance rules – that traffic had increased 10 percent in some parts of Scotland last week.

Meanwhile, London Mayor Sadiq Khan made an even worse assessment, warning that & # 39; & # 39; no return to life will be as it was & # 39; & # 39; and suggested that it would take a long time before bars and restaurants could reopen.

Despite the hard line in public, frantic behind-the-scenes work has ended at a & # 39; development plan & # 39; to develop. Island communities with controllable transport links are set to be used to test ways to loosen restrictions when refurbishing community tests. The Isle of Wight will be among the first pilot sites.

The appearance of Mr. Johnson at the press release tonight will be his first, since reloading on Downing Street since Monday, and will come less than 36 hours after his fiancée Carrie Symonds gave birth to her son.

The prime minister has delayed his paternity until later in the year, in order to prevent the country from fighting the coronavirus outbreak.

At a briefing today in Edinburgh, Ms. Sturgeon said: & # 39; It can be very good too early, even this time new week in any meaningful way to safely lift the current restrictions …

& # 39; The margins we have to make sure the virus doesn't start again are really tight. & # 39;

She said total traffic in Scotland increased by 5 percent in the past week, even though it is still less than a third of & # 39; a pre-lockdown level & # 39; s.

& # 39; In some of our city and city roads, traffic has been 10 percent higher than in & # 39; a week before, & # 39; she said.

She asked people to think if they were now & # 39; a little more active & # 39; were then they had been at the beginning of lockdown.

& # 39; You may think that it only makes you an extra trip, and it's only one trip. And you may feel that you deserve it after weeks of limitation. Believe me, I really understand all of this.

& # 39; But everything adds up. And as everyone starts to decline, the virus will start up again soon and it will have devastating consequences for all of us. & # 39;

Ministers finally admit that they will miss 100,000-a-day test target Matt Hancock today, to & # 39; NHS chiefs say the number is a & # 39; red herring & # 39; is

Ministers have admitted they are missing out today on Matt Hancock & # 39; s coronavirus testing – to & # 39; experts call it a & # 39; red cardiac & # 39; note that the answer has been hindered.

Amid criticism that the UK was lagging behind countries such as South Korea and Germany, the health secretary on April 2 dramatically argued that 100,000 checks per day at & # 39; the end of & # 39; e month would be carried out.

But although the daily capacity is now above 70,000, the number of actual tests still barely reaches half the target.

Justice Secretary Robert Buckland acknowledged from & # 39; this morning that the goal was & # 39; probably & # 39; will fail, to blame the fact that the government started from a & # 39; empty base & # 39; and said he now hopes the numbers in & # 39; in the coming days the mark would reach.

NHS providers, representing & # 39; s confidence in health care, launched a horrific attack on Mr Hancock's handling of the situation, saying that the pressure to drive the number was a & # 39; distraction & # 39; has led to chaotic expansion.

Mr. Khan wrote in the Evening Standard, took an even harder line. & # 39; There & # 39; s not going to come back to life like it was – instead we stand for a & # 39; new normal & # 39; even if lockdown is granted, & # 39; he wrote.

& # 39; We may occasionally see our closest loved ones – but interactions will be limited and for some time there will be no larger meetings.

& # 39; Although non-essential stores will be able to re-open after the introduction of social distance measures, it is difficult to see how this can be extended in a practical way to bars, restaurants or social spaces in a practical way.

& # 39; And most people who are currently unable to work from home will have to do so by doing for the next time. & # 39;

Justice Secretary Robert Buckland said in interviews this morning that the vote among ministers & # 39; extreme caution & # 39; was.

He said, & # 39; I think the common thread between the governments is one of extreme caution following the evidence of & # 39; e Sage Committee, and made sure we didn't do anything in an early way that couldn't risk a second spike. That would be a disaster. & # 39;

He told the BBC Radio 4 Today program: & # 39; I think, within the government there is already a lot of work on & # 39; a battle over what the future will look like – I think it would be a fallacy of & # 39; s duty if we didn't do that.

& # 39; Certainly in my department, I now look at the medium term to what summer and fall will look like in & # 39; e prison and justice system. We have to start with that work, in fact the work is already underway.

Robert Buckland

Nicola Sturgeon

Justice Secretary Robert Buckland (left) said in interviews of & # 39; this morning that the vote among ministers & # 39; extreme caution, and underlined a strong hint by Nicola Sturgeon (right on a briefing in Edinburgh today) that restrictions will be extended for another three weeks when the formal review takes place on May 7

& # 39; Of course, that does not mean that we will suddenly move on to a new phase – we must be sure that the five tests that were set a few weeks ago will be met, and in particular the need to prevent that second or even third spike in & # 39; s illness both to me regarding health and well-being of & # 39; e economy is clear to me. & # 39;

One No10 source said about Mr Johnson's message: & # 39; It will be hot in & # 39; t area how we satisfy our five tests for the exit of & # 39; the lockdown, the & # 39; t of which ensures that we do not risk any other exponential rise infections.

& # 39; It's still too early to reveal details about how & # 39; any relief from & # 39; a lockdown that looks. & # 39;

Data released yesterday revealed that Britain has one of & # 39; worst rates for coronavirus in & # 39; the world has, only better than Spain and Belgium per capita.

UK announces 473 more coronavirus deaths in hospitals – bringing the total to 26,570

Britain today announced 473 more coronavirus deaths in hospitals, taking the UK's official death toll to 26,570.

NHS England declared 391 victims of COVID-19, while Scotland recorded 60 and Wales placed 22. Northern Ireland has yet to announce.

The Department of Health said that official counts, which are not expected to be higher and include deaths that occurred outside hospitals, will be later from & # 39; e noon will be published.

Amid fears, thousands of victims were missing, ministerial ministers called in to take higher pressure to include COVID-19 deaths in nursing homes in the daily update.

Officials yesterday – the first day of the new recording scheme – added an additional 811 deaths to the & # 39; tally. The revised Count saw that Britain jumped to the third global COVID-19 death toll, and meant that the British daily death toll in April was nine times more.

But top statisticians claimed that the count was still thousands short because only Britons who had positive testing for the virus were included. One leading expert claimed that the true number would be more than 30,000.

Revised UK figures including out-of-hospital deaths showed that there had been nine days when the death toll totaled 1,000 – ranging from April 7 to as short as April 24.

Mr. Johnson chaired the daily meeting of & # 39; the morning of coronavirus followed by meetings of his political cabinet and full cabinet, said the & # 39; s official spokesman. e PM.

Chief Medical Officer Professor Chris Whitty and Chief Scientific Advisor Sir Patrick Vallance updated Ministers on the response to coronavirus so far and made progress in delaying & # 39; spread of & # 39; a disease.

State secretaries then update colleagues on the work their departments are doing.

The prime ministers gave another signal that there is little chance of losing before June.

He told a Westminster briefing: & # 39; I think we should wait until the review takes place and I don't think it's wise for me to make that in advance.

& # 39; What you have heard from Chris Whitty, of course, is that this is a disease that & # 39; s not going to be a significant time – he said we have to be realistic, we will have to do a lot of things for a long period of time. . & # 39;

The spokesman added: & # 39; Let's not go ahead with the review, but, as the Prime Minister himself has said, the worst thing we could do is relax the social distance measures too quickly and throw away any progress that & # 39; t is made thanks to & # 39; the hard work and sacrifice of the British public. & # 39;

Labor leader Keir Starmer said he believed a public inquiry into the coronavirus response was now & # 39; inevitable & # 39; used to be.

& # 39; I think the government has been slow to shut down, slow to test, slow to protection equipment, and maybe now slow on our exit strategy, & # 39; he told ITV News.

Wales & # 39; Chief Medical Officer warned & # 39; that's a long way to go & # 39; in & # 39; a fight against coronavirus, adding that the progress & # 39; extremely difficult & # 39; will be.

Dr Frank Atherton told a virtual meeting of the & # 39; Health Committee of & # 39; a Welsh Meeting that Covid-19 & # 39; many surprises & # 39; hadn't appeared on a daily basis.

He demanded a & # 39; more systematic approach & # 39; to understand how the virus has affected the UK and the rest of the world, and each country has different perspectives and answers.

Dr Atherton said the virus reproduction rate – the number of new cases linked to one individual – is now less than one in Wales, meaning lockdown measures are working.

But the meeting heard that there was not much & # 39; headroom & # 39; is for an increase in infections that are likely if such measures are significantly elevated.

& # 39; We are not out here yet and we have to go a long way, & # 39; said Dr Atherton.

London: Apple mobility data for London shows rides increased 2 percent this week and walking was up 8 percent over the weekend during the sunny weather, but fell down when it rained on Monday

London: Apple mobility data for London shows rides increased 2 percent this week and walking was up 8 percent over the weekend during the sunny weather, but fell down when it rained on Monday

Slow Increasing Traffic: At 8am today, traffic was up the same day last week but yesterday. Congestion was 50 percent below average today - almost as high as Monday's busiest day of lockdown even when it was 49% below average. That was a 2 percent increase from last week

Slow Increasing Traffic: At 8am today, traffic was up the same day last week but yesterday. Congestion was 50 percent below the average today – almost as high as Monday's busiest day of lockdown even when it was 49% below average. That was a 2 percent increase from last week

A handful of ministers and officials today personally attended the cabinet, while others attended video conferences.

A handful of ministers and officials today personally attended the cabinet, while others attended video conferences.

& # 39; This virus has many surprises and they appear on a daily basis.

& # 39; Getting out of this sermon is extremely difficult.

& # 39; It is one that we not only do, we consult with our colleague & # 39; s in & # 39; the rest of the UK, and we need to continue learning from others.

& # 39; The virus is not ready for us yet. We continue to adapt our strategy and approach. & # 39;

Dr Atherton said the lockdown restrictions were successful in securing & # 39; the NHS was not overwhelmed but warned that Wales & # 39; not yet out of & # 39; forest & # 39 ;.

He told the meeting that it was & # 39; stuck in & # 39; e tail & # 39; was that the complete suppression of transmission risked a second or possible third wave of the virus.

& # 39; We have to prevent that in some way, & # 39; he said.

Dominic Raab pointed to & # 39; the dangers of an early aggravation yesterday evening, noting that Germany, although it contained the virus liberator, is now an increase in transmission since the opening of & # 39; a backup.

London's transport network could not return to capacity for & # 39; FOUR WEEKS & # 39; if the lockdown requires

London's transport network could be crippled if the UK loses lockdown measures after TfL rounds out 7,000 staff, a strong report revealed today.

The briefing to emergency planners, seen by the BBC, warns that the underground & # 39; will soon be overwhelmed & # 39; if social distance were maintained, saying police would be under pressure if necessary to maintain crowd control.

London's transport system would require four weeks to prepare for & # 39; new challenges, according to the briefing & # 39; lockdown release & # 39 ;.

The London Strategic Co-ordination Group (SCG) document stated the capacity of Tube and buses would be cut to 15 per cent and 12 per cent respectively compared to normal levels, as a space of two meters between passengers is enforced.

RMT military bosses presented another hurdle last week, saying there was & # 39; zero & # 39; zero chance & # 39; that their workers would return without appropriate PPE – around London Mayor Sadiq Khan urging Londoners to wear masks as they travel.

Britain begins to see a return to some normality as traffic returns to the country's motorways – but the government stresses that it does not want to lift lockdown measures too early, while the country still has a & # 39; dangerous moment & # 39 ; in the coronavirus pandemic.

& # 39; Chancellor Merkel has made it clear that they may need a second release in Germany if the infection rate continues to increase, & # 39; said the Secretary of State at the opening of Downing Street.

Despite the stubborn public messages, there is evidence of a broader move to increase & # 39; s economy to & # 39; to get a blow.

DIY stores, fast food chains, cafes and garden centers have scaled up their activities.

Councils have also been told by ministers to recap tips for dismissal.

Ministers are working on a series of workplace manuals with details on how they can look once the lockdown is granted.

Business Secretary Alok Sharma has asked officials to offer advice on how a slow return to work could be safely managed for seven different types of workplaces, including offices, factories and construction sites.

Companies will be told to close canteens and other common spaces, as well as to mean new shift patterns to allow for social distance and reduce the pressure on public transport at peak times.

Office staff are likely encouraged to continue working from home, where possible.

Deputy Chief Medical Officer Jonathan Van-Tam said a partial opening of schools & # 39; in & # 39; was a mix & # 39; but it was & # 39; too early & # 39; to expect early action seen as the burden of social distance within them.

One Whitehall source said that the three weekly review of lockdown measures, thanks to May 7, would only modest changes exist.

& # 39; We are discussing whether we can undo the top button and make things in one or two places more comfortable for the economy, & # 39; added the source. & # 39; But any idea of ​​a comprehensive repeal is just plain wrong. & # 39;

Ipsos MORI research published today suggests Britain

Ipsos MORI research published today suggests Britain

Masked passengers are seen from & # 39; tomorrow on & # 39; e place at Canning Town underground station in London

Masked passengers are seen from & # 39; tomorrow on & # 39; e place at Canning Town underground station in London

Dominic Raab

Matt Hancock

Dominic Raab (left) and Matt Hancock were among those who do not attend the physical cabinet today – with other ministers not choosing to call the meeting

Ministers have outlined five tests that need to be met before lockdown can be lifted in the UK

Ministers have outlined five tests that need to be met before lockdown can be lifted in the UK

Britain's roads are becoming noticeably busier, which fears the country will dissolve itself against government advice. Pictured is the A102 in Greenwich, south-east London, this morning

Britain's roads are becoming noticeably busier, which fears the country will dissolve itself against government advice. Pictured is the A102 in Greenwich, south-east London, this morning

Surgeons don't warn PM about NHS as & # 39; punchbag & # 39; used to stop economic damage

Top surgeons have warned thousands of people will die from Covid-19 as Britain's strict lockdown ceases at this stage.

The Royal College of Surgeons has warned Prime Minister Boris Johnson against the use of the & # 39; NHS as & # 39; an economic punchbag & # 39 ;, he & # 39; s working on his plan to take Britain back to normalcy.

The RCS said the lockdown at this stage could not be unlocked, because not enough health personnel are being tested and there is not enough PPE available for frontline medics.

Professor Neil Mortensen, President-elect of & # 39; e RCS told the Daily Telegraph: & # 39; Just because the NHS has not been overwhelmed so far does not mean that the government can use the health service as its economic punchbag.

& # 39; It has been a close thing, and to use Boris Johnson's own words & # 39; we started to wrestle it to the floor & # 39; but the virus is certainly not defeated. & # 39;

The Scientific Advisory Group on Emergency & # 39; s Government will provide new evidence to ministers in the coming days, but it is expected to say that the lifting of much of & # 39; e restrictions immediately would lead to the onset of infection.

A source from & # 39; the government said that Mr Johnson & # 39; it will be very clear that we will not do anything that could risk this … because then you are back with the virus exponentially spread and the risk of a second lockdown & # 39 ;.

In more pressure on PM to be cautious, top surgeons have warned thousands of people will die from Covid-19 if lockdown is lifted at this stage.

The Royal College of Surgeons said the NHS does not have a & # 39; punchbag & # 39; should be used to prevent damage to the economy.

The RCS said the lockdown at this stage could not be unlocked, because not enough health personnel are being tested and there is not enough PPE available for frontline medics.

Professor Neil Mortensen, President-elect of & # 39; e RCS told the Daily Telegraph: & # 39; Just because the NHS has not been overwhelmed so far does not mean that the government can use the health service as its economic punchbag.

& # 39; It has been a close thing, and to use Boris Johnson's own words & # 39; we started to wrestle it to the floor & # 39; but the virus is certainly not defeated. & # 39;

At & # 39; press conference of & # 39; On the night of last night, Secretary of State Dominic Raab noted a reported rise in virus cases in Germany, which has compounded his lockdown.

He said a similar uptick in & # 39; the UK & # 39; is a very real risk & # 39;

The news came after a day when the tulip of & # 39; dead coronavirus in & # 39; The UK saw through 3,811 to 26,097 now that the government was starting to count people who died in nursing homes as their own homes.

It was the first time the Department of Public Health had people dying outside hospitals in their daily statistics, and the backdated numbers have added thousands to the death toll, which was just 21,678.

But a larger flow was expected. The National Statistics Office reported that more than 4,300 people are known to have died in nursing homes by April 17, but the Healthcare Commission has recorded more than 4,300 in just over forty years in England alone.

However, the government will include only people who have tested positive for the virus in its statistics, despite shaving almost all test kits to hospitals for the first month of the outbreak.

Professor John Newton, the test manager of the & # 39; government, stated that officials had been working on & # 39; Assuming that if one person tested positive for COVID-19 in a home, then everyone else who developed symptoms would probably also have had and did not need testing.

Traffic levels are down across the country, but the roads were still relatively busy this morning in West London

Traffic levels are down across the country, but the roads were still relatively busy this morning in West London

Downing Street's daily briefing reveals the number of new cases of coronavirus in the UK, the number of intensive care deployments and total hospitalizations

Downing Street's daily briefing reveals the number of new cases of coronavirus in the UK, the number of intensive care deployments and total hospitalizations

The ONS and CQC continue to place more reliable, but slower statistics that include reports of people who were suspected of having the disease but were never diagnosed and, as a result, the number of people dying outside hospitals is significantly higher .

US data suggest that the actual number of victims may be 55 percent higher than the government has left, already putting the figure at more than 40,000. Records in Scotland meanwhile mean hospital deaths now account for just 52 per cent of deaths, suggesting the true number is 43,000. The Financial Times estimates that 47,000 people have already died.

The & # 39; data of & # 39; However, health today suggests that hospital patients still account for 83 percent of all deaths – something that is not celebrated by other statistics that are not published in the UK.

Britain today announced 765 more hospital patients to the coronavirus, of which about 600 died in hospitals. NHS England announced 445 more victims, including a healthy 14-year-old, added to 83 declared in Scotland and 73 in Wales.

It comes as the number of people known to have died in nursing homes is increasing and one University of Cambridge expert said people may now die more strongly in homes than in hospitals.

The professor, a highly regarded statistical expert and an OBE recipient, spoke of & # 39; massive, unusual spikes & # 39; in & # 39; number of fatalities in nursing homes and said there was no evidence that nursing homes were over the worst of & # 39; e outbreak, as the rest of & # 39; land is believed to be.

He told MailOnline that the updated death toll was not high enough and the truth was & # 39; at least as much & # 39 ;, setting the total above 30,000.

Speaking about the updated data collection yesterday, Professor Spiegelhalter said: & # 39; It's actually much more than that (3,811).

& # 39; The true number is probably up there as much as it added today, which would take well over 30,000. They do their best and it's a lot better than what we got, but it's still not the complete picture.

& # 39; When you place (these) two datasets (ONS and CQC) together, the new data that is not reported (missing) still lacks a good hundred deaths each day. & # 39;

Separate data released today by the National Records of Scotland has made it very clear that the deaths of hospitals announced every day by government officials, but shows a fraction of reality.

National data shows that hospital patients made up only 52 percent of all deaths, while 39 percent happened in nursing homes and 11 percent elsewhere. When they together Scotland's total deaths for April 26 were added almost doubled from 1,262 to 2,272.

Nursing homes, which are probably still in the grip of the coronavirus, are disaster strikes and the government is heavily criticized for alleged failures to help prepare the sector.

In England and Wales, the number of residents dying from each cause has almost doubled in one month, from about 2,500 a week in March to 7,300 in a single week in April – more than 2,000 of the last COVID-19 cases confirmed.

Healthcare Quality Commission (CQC) reports suggest that nursing homes now see about 400 coronavirus deaths each day, on average – a number equal to hospitals in the UK.

The way data is backdated means that the true picture of what happens in nursing homes is unclear, as we currently only have statistics from two weeks ago.

The true scale of the crisis is also masked by a lack of routine testing, which means that hundreds of older residents may have died without ever being diagnosed.

Public Health England data has revealed that almost a third of all nursing homes in the country have reported their coronavirus outbreaks.

Boarding planes could include FOUR HOURS with added health checks and much higher ticket prices after securing ends, experts warn

by LARA KEAY for MailOnline

On board an aircraft, it can take up to four hours if passengers are allowed to fly again if the coronavirus's lock is easier, it was revealed today.

Flyers could be asked to avoid four hours in order to allow health checks and social distance measures, one expert warns.

Flights will be more expensive, as air carriers only have a limited number of people on board to ensure they stay two meters from each other.

This will bring down stock prices and create a & # 39; uncomfortable & # 39; flying experience for as long as five years, another travel expert told The Times.

On board an aircraft, it can take up to four hours for passengers to be able to fly again if the coronavirus lock is easiest, according to some experts. Pictured: A man was riding on a plane yesterday at an empty Barcelona airport

On board an aircraft, it can take up to four hours for passengers to be able to fly again if the coronavirus lock is easiest, according to some experts. Pictured: A man was riding on a plane yesterday at an empty Barcelona airport

Andrew Charlton, manager of & # 39; the Aviation Advocacy law firm, told the newspaper: & # 39; Even as vaccines begin to rain tonight, we still look forward to two years to return to levels seen before the outbreak, and it will likely be more than five years.

& # 39; There will be fewer flights, less seats available, prices will go up and there will be very uncomfortable conditions due to the requirement to wear personal protective equipment and maintain social distance. & # 39; ;

Earlier this month, easyJet announced that it plans to keep middle seats low on its aircraft when flying starts again.

But airline analyst Chris Tarry claims maintaining a two-meter gap between passengers would mean that 80 percent of seats would be empty.

To make sure that airlines are still profitable, they will need to increase exponential ticket prices, he told The Times.

It would also mean that barely used routes are also abolished.

Air travel has been plummeting worldwide to stop the spread of coronavirus from country to country, with airports almost empty, except for a small number of repatriation flights.

British Airways has reportedly planned to make 12,000 workers – a quarter of its entire workforce – redundant after they were hit by the COVID-19 outbreak.

Virgin Atlantic has gone to Australia with founder Sir Richard Branson desperately trying to hang the UK business.

Wizz Air will be the first commercial airline to start operating in the UK again tomorrow, but says all passengers should wear face masks.

It will operate 15 routes from Luton Airport to a scale of destinations, including Budapest, Lisbon and Tenerife.

Wizz Air will be the first commercial airline to start operating in the UK again tomorrow, but says all passengers should wear face masks. File image used

Wizz Air will be the first commercial airline to start operating in the UK again tomorrow, but says all passengers should wear face masks. File image used

Lufthansa will resume on Monday, but has told all passengers to wear a face mask or scarf that does not cover their mouth and nose.

The government has made it clear that foreign travel will be for most people by 2020.

Those who do not hope to shine on their summer holidays will be disappointed, with many European destinations such as Italy, Spain and France, brutally hit by the virus.

Ministers have told Britons not to end their trip with staycations, warning that beauty spots such as Cornwall and Snowdonia do not have the NHS infrastructure to deal with if visitors fall ill.

On cruise ships, passengers also face strict medical checks.

The UK's largest P&O is developing plans for a series of & # 39; strict measures & # 39; to ensure that they follow international health guidelines when resuming operations, if the coronavirus pandemic decreases.

Other changes that are being considered include reducing the capacity of ships, scrapping self-service buffets and implementing one-way systems on board.

. (tagsToTranslate) dailymail (t) news (t) Boris Johnson (t) Coronavirus (t) Downing Street (t) UK Government News and updates on the British Cabinet (t) NHS

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