Asteroid half of Mount Everest's size is set to fly through Earth next week and an image shows the object & # 39; wear a mask & # 39; similar to the scientist who & # 39; s observing it in the middle of & # 39; e pandemic of coronavirus

  • An asteroid is set to pass within 3.9 million miles of Earth April 29
  • It was first detected in 1998 and is unlikely to clash with Earth
  • Experts who observed it said that the asteroid looks like wearing a face mask
  • The team is currently wearing masks to limit the spread of the coronavirus
  • Here you can help people who are not affected by Covid-19

An asteroid half the size of Mount Everest will fly through Earth next week and astronomers have taken a picture of the object as it moves to our planet.

The Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico snapped a radar image of asteroid 1998 OR2 that will pass within 3.9 million miles of us on April 29.

The team currently has masks in the facility to control the spread of the coronavirus and has compared the appearance of the object to itself.

& # 39; TeamRadar and the staff of the NAIC Observatory take proper safety precautions as we pass observations, & # 39; reads a tweet,

& # 39; This week we observed near-Earth asteroid 1998 OR2, which seems to be wearing a mask! & # 39;

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An asteroid half the size of Mount Everest will fly through Earth next week and astronomers have taken a picture of the object as it moves to our planet. The Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico captures a radar image of asteroid 1998 OR2 that will pass on April 29 within 3.9 million miles of our

The asteroid was first discovered by NASA in 1998, and is said to be & # 39; large enough to cause global effects & # 39; if it were to hit Earth – but the US space agency says it is highly unlikely.

The discovery came on the heels of NASA and & # 39; install new modern computer and data analytics hardware that speeds up our search for objects in & # 39; surrounding areas, & # 39; said NEAT Project Manager Dr Steven Pravdo of JPL, in a statement.

The asteroid orbits the sun every 1,340 days, or 3.67 years, and completes a rotation on its axis every 4.11 days, CNN first reported.

Astronomers estimate that the OR2 of 1998 is between 1.1 and 2.5 miles (1.8 to 4.1 kilometers) wide – large enough that an impact can threaten human civilization. But, to repeat, there is nothing to be afraid of here; the asteroid will miss us by a large margin on April 29.

The team is currently wearing masks in & # 39; the facility to control the spread of the coronavirus and has compared the appearance of the object to itself. & # 39; This week we observed near-Earth asteroid 1998 OR2, which doesn't look like wearing a mask, & # 39; shared it in a Tweet

The team is currently wearing masks in & # 39; the facility to control the spread of the coronavirus and has compared the appearance of the object to itself. & # 39; This week we observed near-Earth asteroid 1998 OR2, which doesn't look like wearing a mask, & # 39; shared it in a Tweet

However, the European Space Agency (ESA) sent out a warning last year that there are currently 878 asteroids at risk of the Earth being hit in the next 100 years.

The agency added that an impact by even a small asteroid can lead to & # 39; serious destruction & # 39; and, to reduce the risks of collision, the ESA and several other groups have been working together to look for asteroids.

They are also developing technology to deflect space rocks and will discuss possible tactics at various meetings in Europe.

The ESA said, & # 39; This ESA catalog brings together all the asteroids you & # 39; ve known, that & # 39; t a & # 39; & # 39; non-zero & # 39; & # 39; have an opportunity on Earth in & # 39; the next 100 years – which means that an impact, though unlikely, cannot be ruled out. & # 39;

Astronomers hunt for asteroids larger than 450ft, to avoid catastrophic damage. can cause

Researchers have discovered most of the asteroids that are about a mile in size, but are now on & # 39; hunting for those who are about 459ft (140m) – around them can cause catastrophic damage.

Although no one knows when the next big impact will happen, scientists have found themselves under pressure to predict – and distinguish – their arrival.

Pictured artist image

Pictured artist image

& # 39; Sooner or later we will … get a small or big impact, & # 39; said Rolf Densing, who heads the European Space Operations Center (ESOC) in Darmstadt

It may not happen in our lives, he said, but & # 39; the risk that Earth will one day turn into a devastating event is very high. & # 39;

& # 39; For now, there's not much we can do. & # 39;

Source: AFP

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